Looking for some Ruby Gems

2lach on November 25, 2018

Hello shiny gems of Dev.to So I'm getting a bit into Ruby and Rails I have been taking some small nibbles here and... [Read Full]
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The best way to learn Ruby is by writing it. Choose an idea for an app and build it. When you encounter an error, Google search the error and fix it.

Here are a few good Rails resources, starting with the docs.

guides.rubyonrails.org/
gorails.com
rubyweekly.com
github.com/ankane/secure_rails <-- Best practices for security
github.com/ankane/production_rails <--- Best practices for running in production

 

Amen to that.

This advice is true for most techs and languages but Rails has a huge community and docs/tutorial all over the place, it's really easy to get into it by starting a project and using trial and error to learn.

I'll add another thing: use a linter. It's a very good way to enforce best practices, I recommend using Rubocop. Again, that's general advice for a lot of techs/languages but Ruby gets really interesting when done "the Ruby way".

 

Thanks for the advise 👍 I know it's super awesome that there is so much material avalible! it's almost crazy, which is awesome but kinda makes me don't know what end to start at 😋

 

Tnx for you'r insights 😀 This was exactly what I was looking for 👍

 

Being a enthusiast ruby developer, I would say that the best idea is to start writing a simple app, something like a todo list or a twitter-like app. Most of them makes you work with different concepts, loops, data structures (and its persistance).

I also recommend you into other open source applications (exercism for example is a rails application), specially looking the specs/tests.

About resources, I would recommend the book:

Also, playing with ruby koans, or the exercism ruby track it's a great (and fun imho) way to learn.

Last, the core documentation is awesome. Familiarize yourself at least, with String, Array and Enumerable, you are likely to work with those objects almost 90% of the time.

When you know a bit more I'd recommend:

  • Practical Object Oriented Design
  • Ruby metaprogramming
  • Confident Ruby

Hope it works! :)

 

Awesome tips 😁
Tnx man and have an awesome day!

 

When I was starting to get into Ruby on Rails I found the Ruby on Rails Tutorial book to be really useful. It explains concepts and helps you build an application from scratch. I found it to be a good mix between theory and coding.

When having doubts, I'd recommend posting them either in the Ruby subreddit or here in dev.to.

Have fun in your Rails studies!

 

Tnx for the advise 😁 and have a Good One!

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