re: Udemy Needs to Review Courses and Vet Instructors VIEW POST

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re: "Dating" is an over-simplification I suppose but it was in quotes (meaning that isn't really the true subject), but even that isn't the point. You ...

This kind of content valuable to me, it's valuable to Ashlee, it's valuable to a whole heck of a lot of women developers who learned things on Udemy. If they allow this sort of stuff onto the site, what's the quality of the tech courses I've taken?

And no one is attacking you.

So true, Ali.
Above all, I don't see how trying to make dev community better is not related in any way with the community. I just don't get how trying to get rid of inapropiate content for a large part of this dev community in a training/learning-platform which we all probably use is not related to the community. I guess the point is, that if he's not part of the half of the community that was the target of these 'courses', he doesn't feel related to it. I guess asking for empathy in dev community is not related to it?
I can't explain it in any other way.

As any dev and ops should now, housekeeping is needed. In our project, on our server, in our database etc... We track any code smell, any misuse of variable name, any bug, any old revision that should have been stopped long ago, we try to get rid as much useless data as possible. I see now reason why our community should not have any use of housekeeping. I do not wish to see any sexist thought or any racial division in tech community for a dev is a dev. As such, content promoting that you could "hack a woman brain" is first forbidden by alot of laws as manipulation is not really a legal thing, second why a woman brain? are they more easier? Those kind of idea are just brought by the title, I let you imagine the rest of the course. Honestly, I would agree with any course called "how to find your codemate, or how to find the best match for pair programming" but not how "I can with my super programming power hijack the brain of this girl". That reductive for the women and for us as developer.
At least I believe.

On a side note, this kind of content seems appropriate since dev.to put up "Yet she coded" (I believe it the name of the post series? I may have it wrong) and as such position itself on the non discrimination of gender in tech related topic.

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