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Discussion on: Why Older People Struggle In Programming Jobs

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alliwalk profile image
Allison Walker

I'm not sure if what I'm reading is due to age and experience, or just a realization that there's a lot of emotional unintelligence in the tech world. This is aside from the sexism and lack of diversity.

No one likes to be treated like an engine part, or ignored completely, yet the tech world or the business world seems to be fine with it.

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d4vev profile image
David Vincent-West • Edited

I am in complete agreement with your assessment, Allison, in calling out a lack of emotional intelligence in the industry. The drivers are surely vast and numerable, though I would take this a step further, when you say: "This is aside from the sexism and lack of diversity." I can't help but wonder "maybe the sexism and lack of diversity are strong indicators of this lacking EQ"?

Bringing my own perspective into this discussion as a black man in his late thirties who is actually fortunate to be in a leadership position (granted, the hellscape that is "first line leadership"), I wont say redressing the problems of diversity and inclusion are the magic cure to this lack of emotional intelligence, but redressing the problems of diversity and inclusion along the familiar lines of race, gender and sexual orientation does make room for additional modes of thinking that can (I think) open more pathways for emotional intelligence that aren't presently utilized.

Curious what you think?

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Allison Walker

That's probably true. Increased training in emotional intelligence (EQ) -- seeing the humanity in our co-workers -- would probably have some spillover effects into some of these tougher issues.

Of course, there's a gendered or diversity-related component to everything. There should be a specific focus on these areas if the goal is to increase awareness and overcome inherent bias. It's both/and, not one or the other.