re: Is software developer fatigue a thing? VIEW POST

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I usually enjoy to try new stuff and build something with it just to see how it works in practice. Then, periodically I decide if that language/tool can be part of my toolbox (which usually implies excluding something else already present and study more details of the new one).

Actually my stack is:

  • FreeBSD for servers instead of Linux (I’m terrified by the actual ecosystem, such as systemd)
  • Ansible for provisioning (new entry, always built my *nix boxes manually, I’m an old school ex sysadmin)
  • FreeBSD jails rather than Docker, mostly for security and isolation
  • Elixir for backend development (mostly web apps, APIs, etc). Before Elixir/Phoenix, I’ve used Ruby/Rails for almost 10 years, I was looking for something different and tried Node, Go as potential replacement, but they didn’t improve the quality of my workflow nor offered a better solution to my everyday job tasks. Elixir/Phoenix totally replaced what I was able to do with Ruvy/Rails. I’m excited to think at it as my preferred language/framework for the next 5-10 years at least.
  • Bash/Ruby/Python/Go for system scripts, bots, scrapers, utils, etc. I pick the language based on the task to accomplish. My rule of thumb is always the KISS principle.

I’m not scaried when I see a new language/stack/framework, instead I’m excited to give it a try. It might be the next entry in my toolbox. In the worst case, I can express an opinion about it ;-)

 

FreeBSD for servers instead of Linux (I’m terrified by the actual ecosystem, such as systemd)

I've given up on Linux on desktop a long time ago to be honest and I've been using OSX ever since. It's not perfect but it's good enough for me and it has everything I need.

I’m not scaried when I see a new language/stack/framework, instead I’m excited to give it a try. It might be the next entry in my toolbox. In the worst case, I can express an opinion about it ;-)

hahaha yes :-) I don't disdain new tech, I'm not a luddite, just saying out loud that sometimes I think we have too many similar technologies :-)

 

btw @andreapavoni , do you use Elixir at work or just your personal projects?

I started with some personal projects in 2015, then I did some professional work (2 apps deployed) during 2016-2017 and continued developing a bunch of personal projects and published packages on hex.pm. Last month I’ve started working full time on Elixir for a company, I’m lucky enough to use my toolbox (well, it’s the same compared to the tools they use, except for Linux/Docker)

 

I've given up on Linux on desktop a long time ago to be honest and I've been using OSX ever since. It's not perfect but it's good enough for me and it has everything I need.

Yeah, me too, I use macos since 2012, I’ve been on Linux since 1999. Then, even on servers, I strongly preferred FreeBSD over the many distros available (I was Slackware and Gentoo user, switched to Ubuntu years later for lazyness). Give it a try on VirtualBox if you never used it ;-)

hahaha yes :-) I don't disdain new tech, I'm not a luddite, just saying out loud that sometimes I think we have too many similar technologies :-)

I mostly agree and I think there are several reasons behind this, however it’s not a concern for me. I mean, I see this as a larger pool to pick from when you’re looking for something different or better, for fun or profit, whatever 😉

 

I’m seeing Linux on Desktop succeed in super-linear growth, so I don’t think there is a reason to give up — we just need to have the breath to walk the long road: Linux on Desktop GNU vs kilowindows

(→ source)

I understand, it could also be that Chrome OS is integral part of that but I have been using OSX since 2006 and I love it. I'm honestly happy about it and I have a totally lazy approach when it comes to the operating system.

Anyhow, I'm also happy about the rise of Linux.

As I already said, I’ve started on Linux in 1999 (I mean 100%, full time, even being the only one in companies where I worked) and stopped using it in 2012. As you can imagine, I was more than patient with it, then I realized it wasn’t for me anymore (I personally think that it sucks right now for tens of reasons, but I understand and respect who uses it, of course). I don’t care if its user base is growing if it can’t offer a flawless experience. I still remember when Gnome devs were more focused on fancy (and crashing) window manager fx while as of today it still lacks a coherent desktop experience between apps. On the server side things aren’t better, considering that systemd almost ruined any chance of decent administration (such as silent fails and binary logs just to name a few examples, crazy!). Still, people uses it, I hope they’re fine, not for me anymore.

systemd is one of the reasons why I worry about GNU/Linux. At home I’m avoiding systemd completely, but I’m not happy that I have to. I understand people who use it, because I once cheered for pulseaudio — until it bit me again and again — and systemd plays the same game as pulseaudio: somewhat working tools built on badly maintainable foundation with lots of problematic politics, but "just follow us" solutions to problems many devs face. Essentially a golden trap people willingly walk into. Like OSX, but I can still avoid it.

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