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I'm a new coder, not sure what to blog about? Any suggestions?

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Hello, my fellow amazing people! I'd love your thoughts on how to begin my coding blog. I'm in a coding bootcamp. Started learning ruby on rails, in about two weeks I'll be building my first project in rails, so I'll definitely write about that, but until then? Any suggestions that can help would be greatly appreciated! :)

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Waiting on those project blog posts 😁

Hmm...
Dev.to is great in that we can ask questions or celebrate victories or teach.

Tell us why you chose a bootcamp as opposed to other options (if any) available to you.

Or what was the topic/ piece of code that will stick with you forever? Was it a struggle and why? If you were to revisit, how'd you make it better. Any life lessons as a result? (Cause I'm nosey πŸ€ͺ)

Write your career's press release - next time this year what will you be doing? Why's that exciting to you now? What steps will you take to make that fictitious press release a reality?

I got you! πŸ‘ŒπŸΎπŸ˜‚

 

Anything you are learning about can make for a good article. Something to remember is that plenty of articles can be useful by being precise and specific. You don't have to write "The ultimate guide to Ruby on Rails." You could write about how to solve one specific problem. Here's an example where I did something like that: glennstovall.com/no-x-frame-option...

You could treat your blog like a wiki of things you've learned. Some of my most popular articles have come from me writing about problems so I'd remember how to solve them if they came up again :).

Another helpful thing is to treat writing like code, and by that I mean use some design patterns! You don't have to reinvent the wheel. Here's a list I've collated over time to help me get started:

  • Question & Answer
  • How-tos
  • Next actions
  • Mistakes
  • Lists
  • Resources
  • Samples
  • Reviews
  • Philosophy
  • Inspirational
  • How to approach the problem
  • X vs Y
  • Quick tips
  • Case study

You can take any topic or problem you are tackling, and run it through each of these to generate some ideas. Let's take, for example, testing models with RSpec.

  • (Q & A): Should you use RSpec to test your models?
  • (How-to): How to get started with unit testing models using RSpec
  • (Next Actions): How to refactor model code after writing unit tests
  • (mistakes): Avoid these 5 mistakes when writing RSpec model tests
  • (X vs Y): RSpec vs. Minitest, which one should you use
  • (Samples): 7 Examples of complex RSpec Model tests
  • (Philosophy): Why testing makes your coding faster, not slower

And so on and so forth. Don't let "what to write about" paralyze you. There is plenty out there. Just take some inventory, sketch out some ideas, and get started! The more you write, the more you'll find you have to say.

It also doesn't have to be technical. I see a couple of other replies mentioning interest in your Bootcamp experience, so it looks like you already have some people excited to read what you have to say! If you run "my Bootcamp experience" through the above exercise, what can you come up with? Excited to see what you come up with on your blog or here on dev.to!

 

Talk about your bootcamp experience! Talk about what learning ruby on rails is like! What makes blogging so special is that it doesn't matter if someone's written about it before, you're not writing a wiki. Try to think of it more like a journal or a diary. We want to read about your experiences through the world of software engineering and the more you write the better πŸ˜ƒ

 

Thank you everyone! All of your comments have been super helpful, and I've made a list to begin detailing my experiences in a coding bootcamp, things I've learned, things I'm learning, and all my wonderful struggles & victories 🀩!

 

I would love to see you write some blog posts about things that have been difficult to learn or understand. It can be hard for more experienced devs to remember what it was like when we were just learning, and it leads to things like us writing really unhelpful documentation. Try documenting the parts of Ruby that are weird or confusing, or how you remembered parts that seemed tricky!

 

You can write about your challenges during the bootcamp and how you overcame them so future bootcampers will go through this experience more smoothly

 

I've never been in a bootcamp myself but I know they're very popular. I would love to know what the experience is like.

 
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