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Questions To Ask In Your Job Interview

chiubaca profile image Alex Chiu ・3 min read

So you've got through the last hour of interview grilling and it's all gone well. The finish the line is in sight. The interviewer goes on to asks you...

"So, do you have any questions for us?"

Don't do yourself a disservice. Make sure have some question lined up.

Remember a job interview is a two-way thing. As much they are seeing if you are a good fit for them, you also need to see if the company is a good fit for you!

Here are some of the questions which I have been using in my recent round of job interviews.


What does success look like in this role and how will I be measured?

I've noticed smaller companies tend to fumble around on this question. They may not have a formal review process in place yet. This is not necessarily a bad thing. It indicates that you have room to decide what your goals and targets should be.

Larger companies may be able to provide a more satisfying answer if a clear structure and routine are important to you.

How would you describe the work-life culture?

The responses you get back will give you a feel for how stressful the job can be.

At one place, the manager said that they "were married to this job". That was instant red-flag for me.

A pretty standard response is that you have your core-hours, but there will inevitably be times you have to do some over-time for launches or to meet deadlines. How the company reimburses you for this can be good follow on question.

What progression do you envision for someone in this role?

If you're planning to be at this company for a long time, this is a good question to get a feel for what your career progression will look like. I've had un-satisfying responses back from smaller companies where the hierarchy is much flatter. If you're also co-interviewed with a senior developer you can try and tease out how long it took for them to get to where they are.

Am I replacing someone or is this a new role?

If the role is new, it indicates the team/company is expanding, this is usually a good thing. If you're replacing someone, it's good to understand if they were promoted or if they left for some other reason. Obviously, if you find out your predecessor left for some negative reasons, this could be a red flag.

What is the current runway, and what are your future funding plans?

This question only makes sense if you're interviewing at a startup. You should ask this to understand how stable the company is. Definitely do your own homework around the startup and the founders too! Don't just take their word for it.

What are your company and team values?

A good company will know clearly the kind of people that want, the culture that they want to build and how they want they work. It's usually quite worrying if they can't answer this question easily.

What are your favourite things about working here?

I like to finish on this one and is usually a fun question for the hiring managers to answer.


Feel free to use and adapt these questions for your next interview. Accepting a new job is a big deal so make sure you know what you're getting yourself into.

Good luck with the job hunt!

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