re: The Rise of Microsoft Visual Studio Code VIEW POST

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Nice data, it is clear that the IDE argument is not so false after all, and I totally agree that editors like VIM and Vs Code are way better than IDE's like eclipse, NetBeans or that crap that jetbrains offers.

It is sad too to see how Sublime Text is slowly dying... It is getting to much behind from the others, even that of Atom. And we all know its performance sucks.

On the other hand if Microsoft moves away from Electron, Vs Code will be unbeatable, much like chrome is on the browser market share space.

 

I've been a developer/software engineer/software architect for over 25 years, and you'll only take my JetBrain's IDEs out of my cold, grey, dead hands.

I can always tell the code people write in VIM, Sublime, Notepad, VSCode, etc. because the code is filled with bugs that my JetBrain's IDEs flag for me and make sure they are errors I do not make.

 

I don't see the difference.. Linters and the language server protocol are available for all editors too, I personally think that if someone writes bug filled code on a specific tool, it is not the tool for the blame, but the programmer.

Sure it is the programmer's fault. It's their fault for not choosing good tools! He or she would have less reason to be blamed had they used better tools.

By the same logic, mechanics don't need wrenches, they only need hammers, and they should treat everything like a nail and bang on it. That makes no sense.

Good IDEs can make good developers better because they help them learn the language better than they would if they were left to scratching their head trying to understand why something does not work in a text editor. In an IDE the developer can read the hints that explain why it does not work and learn from them. I have been learning Go for the past 3 months and GoLand has been a godsend!

A good engineer knows that one of the most important aspects of being a good engineer is to pick the best tools for the job (and yes, I am a degreed engineer.)

That said, if you think working in a text editor is best for you, more power to you.

 

Nice data, it is clear that the IDE argument is not so false after all, and I totally agree that editors like VIM and Vs Code are way better than IDE's like eclipse, NetBeans or that crap that jetbrains offers.

Visual Studio code is still a notepad on steroid. You can't compare with a full-fledged IDE.

And VIM... really?

 

Your totally right! VsCode and specially VIM will not make you a dependent mediocre dev like many of the others IDE's do, I have seen 95% of "IDE engineers" fail miserably when they have no access to their IDE, and the best engineers I have seen and worked with are able to write clean code on sublime, notepad, Atom, VsCode, Netbeans or whatever.

And yeah VIM really, this is not the first data that suggest that VIM or Emacs engineers have more solid core knowledge, and I'm quite happy to see that IDE's are declining, because people sometimes is not objective when it comes to understand that all tools have strengths and flaws, and I believe this actually hurts the industry as it is a red flag for a junior engineer, a senior should know this core principle at heart.

insights.stackoverflow.com/survey/...

Effort and result are not the same.

Anyways, an engineer loves technology and hates outdated tools, engineering is about solving problem and efficiency.

In my case, I use bots to generate code, it has killed jobs. People could complain that it is not fair but it still happens.

 

I will say to you what Dennis Ritchie said about Unix, in the days when Apple and Windows were yet to be consumer products: those who do not understand Unix are doomed to reinvent it -- badly.

Emacs and Vim are so incredibly powerful that they do things most people, including programmers, did not realize were possible in an editor. You probably work incredibly inefficiently, but you don't even realize what you could not be doing.

It was my first "ide":

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/_vK84lvwQwo/hqdefault.jpg

And it was a decade after Linux. However, I stick with modern tools.

Yeah, I wrote that stuff too. 15 years before Linux. And -- editors are tools. You should use the right one for the job. If you're unfamiliar with a power tool, you might not appreciate it. I could go into detail, but I don't think I can do a better job than this famous post: gist.github.com/nifl/1178878

Oh, and Dennis Ritchie was talking about Unix, not Linux, which is of course just a flavor of Unix. Which is so ancient a tool that it powers just about everything. So, yeah, "modernity" is not a useful metric for anything.

 

I guess it really depends on what you work on. I do .NET development and couldn't see myself not using Visual Studio - I consider it the best development tool I've ever used. That said, I've had terrible experiences with Eclipse and Netbeans when doing Java development though I don't know how much was the editor or the language so its not an IDE vs Non-IDE thing.

When I've done PHP development though, I am using VS Code. I tried Atom but found it crashing too often. Prior to that, I actually used Geany which is probably an uncommon editor for Windows.

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