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Where do You Belong in Tech

Firangiz Ganbarli
CoE student, currently learning Python 🐍
Updated on ・1 min read

From what I have seen, majority of the blog posts on dev.to are written by web devs. That may be because of the increasing popularity of it, however, there are dozens of other career possibilities within the tech industry and I would like to introduce them in this blog post so that you too can explore different areas of the technology world.

And this is not an exhausting list, there are many more careers that I have not included. Research further if interested.

List of Careers

  1. Cyber Security Engineer
  2. Front-End Web Developer
  3. Backend Web Developer
  4. UI/UX Designer
  5. DevOps
  6. Mobile Engineer
  7. QA Engineer
  8. Product Manager
  9. Data Scientist
  10. Embedded Software Engineer
  11. Systems Administrator
  12. Database Administrator
  13. Networking Engineer
  14. Hardware Engineer
  15. OS Developer
  16. Video Game Developer
  17. Technical Account Manager

How to Know Which One is For You

You can never know for sure unless you have tried it all. But that takes time to experiment, so here is a little tip that helped me.

Select top 3 from the list above. Now, choose one from them and try out a side project or learn it for a month. If you like it, continue. If you don't, move on to the second.

If you are done with your top three, rinse and repeat. I still advise you to learn about other fields even if you liked your first selection though.

Good luck fellas!

Discussion (14)

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mccurcio profile image
Matt Curcio • Edited

Hi F,
This list is EXCELLENT! Thanks!
I have thought that the 'teaching arm' of the computer community in general has never done a great job at showing new people all the options for computer/tech.

I have wondered:

  • Are there so many new people entering all the time that no one really has that knowledge YET? To get a bird's eyeview you have to be around long enough to see the entire landscape.

  • Or is it the overlap between job titles/job descriptions is entangled with so many common skills that it is difficult to tease them apart? For example, working with Linux can be pigeon-holed into almost any of the job descriptions. It is tough to find what is unique about each position.

I think it would be great if people could also add to this list as they see fit.
Then it seems another step should be that the job descriptions should be added to the titles.

Any thoughts?

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firangizg profile image
Firangiz Ganbarli Author

Making a blog post on each career is definitely something I would be keen to do. Sounds informational and interesting. As for the reason why not many people are aware of these, my guess is because of the abundance of the entry-level positions being titled as Software Engineer, but including aspects of the jobs above really is discarded by many. In many software engineering jobs, some of the duties and tasks of others (like mobile engineering/UI developer/DevOps) going to come in handy. And technology industry is ever evolving, but I still think its fairly new that many self-learners and people coming from bootcamps, basically, untraditional employees just do not have the luxury to dive into one of these first up based on how they have learnt. In colleges, you can take a class in Operating Systems and learn that there is someone who deals with them. But if you are self-learning, you really have to refer to experienced people/reliable sources in tech industry to learn that a job like that exists in first place. People who self-learn without a traditional means of learning for tech industry really need to devise their own curriculum to explore some of these options I think.

Thanks for making me think about this.

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mccurcio profile image
Matt Curcio

It does seem like many jobs are lumped together under the title "Software Engineer." I think this is probably the best key word search term that scoops up the most freshman coders.

Your idea of new learners not knowing where to turn was also on my mind. For example, I have been in the position where I learned I could do something only after I learned about it. The "Don't know what you don't know at times."

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petertorres profile image
Pete Torres

To be completely frank, if you're just starting out and want to get an understanding of the various career paths and how they function together at a professional level, consider starting out at a service/support team. As the initial point of entry into information systems, a support team is typically involved in much of the day-to-day operations, access management and monitoring of all the systems in an organization (networking, application, storage appliances, server equipment, power/capacity, etc.). Additionally, support teams are considered service coordinators and can be expected to work along side engineering teams and managers. The benefit here is a wide understanding of what the various roles actually do while also establishing a professional network of colleagues that will help you move into other, more specialized, paths as you progress through your career. My advice is don't get hung up on job titles. Be a specialized generalist. Learn to be a combination of roles and avoid painting yourself into a corner. "DevOps" wouldn't be a thing if it weren't for those few engineers that decided to never stop learning.
Thank you for taking the time to share your post. Good luck!

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firangizg profile image
Firangiz Ganbarli Author

Great piece of advice, it does kinda all turn back to the concept of jack of all trades vs master of one, but at the end, what you say holds true. Thanks for your comment!

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unlucky profile image
UnLucky

2
4
16

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firangizg profile image
Firangiz Ganbarli Author

Fun choices, I feel like they can be integrated in same projects too. Good luck w them!

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unlucky profile image
UnLucky

dribbble.com/Lokesh3152
U can check out some noob designs

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srknhcgl profile image
srknhcgl

what about RPA developer, blockchain developer, SEO expert, Cloud Engineer, Project Manager, Big Data engineer, ERP developer, CRM developer?

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firangizg profile image
Firangiz Ganbarli Author

All good additions to the list. Honestly, I am surprised I forgot blockchain developer and cloud engineering, considering I am interested in those. Thanks for your comment!

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khuljohn profile image
khuliso John Thavhiwa

Thanks you for the help, as a begginer i wasn't aware they are so many fields in tech industry to choose from

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firangizg profile image
Firangiz Ganbarli Author

Yep, research about them more. There are more than what I have written in the list!

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dev_hills profile image
Hillary Chibuko

Wowee...
Eye opener indeed

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firangizg profile image
Firangiz Ganbarli Author

Thank you :)