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Running One On Ones Remotely

Greg Thomas
I write a lot of code. I've also written a book on developers becoming leaders/managers called Code Your Way Up.
・2 min read

When I started off as a Manager, I met with my team for our regularly scheduled team meetings. I thought this was enough to catch the pulse of what the team was doing, how everyone was, and listen for any roadblocks that might be on the verge of cropping up.

That helped me, but not my team.

It wasn't until about 6 - 8 months in that it was suggested to me to sit down with each member individually and talk to them about any issues affecting them, their career aspirations, and overall how they are doing. At the time, I didn't have One-On-Ones with my manager so I didn't quite understand the concept.

After the first few sessions with each team member, I quickly realized how much information I was missing out on and where I really needed to be focusing my time and energy to help them grow. Those sessions with my team would be at the back of my head in every decision that came for the team;

  • Does this align with Jane's goals?
  • Would this be a good fit to put Simon on?
  • How would Sally feel about taking on some more leadership roles?

(horrible names I know, but you get the idea)

Running One-On-Ones Remotely

Fast forward to now, in the midst of being 100% remotely operating with my team and I've been figuring out how to ensure I'm still able to provide One-On-Ones to my team that helps them remotely as much as they did when we were side-by-side with each other. It hasn't been easy, I've had to learn a few new tricks.

I cohost a podcast that we started from everyone going remote called Remotely Prepared. In our most recent episode we talk about how to get the most out of your (One-On-Ones remotely)[https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/staying-connected-with-remote-one-on-ones/id1514693059?i=1000497351322].

The key message, if you've stopped them because having hard conversations is a struggle over video, start them back up again. Go through those hard conversations and push yourself to have them.

Because if you're struggling with having them, you can be sure your team is as well, and it might be just the right time to kick them back up again (it's never too late).

I wrote a book on Leading Software Teams - Code Your Way Up - available as an eBook or Paperback on Amazon (CAN and US).

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