The Blessing of Rejection (or Growing Past the "No")

Arit Amana on September 14, 2018

I feel almost guilty to admit that it's taken me just shy of 3 weeks to write this post. If you've followed my developer journey so far, you've rea... [Read Full]
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Love this so much 👏🏻 Getting a job is essentially a numbers game. Like sales, you're going to hear no a lot, but that doesn't matter because eventually someone will say yes. And that's all you need. Perseverance is key!

 

Yes Allison! I'm in it to win it 😁 Thank you for your support 🤗

 

For me, and many of the places I worked at, what we looked for in candidates were those who were passionate about learning and discussing what they know. Quite a few times I have found self-learners to be more excited about learning and trying new things than someone who has gone through the degree process. There are many on both sides, but no need to cut yourself short. I can find just as many CS grads who think they know all and don't put in the time to learn anymore more than they need, as I can those who are grads and those who are self-taught that will spend the time necessary to keep their skills up.

Sometimes the rejection can be a blessing so you can learn from it, I had plenty of rejections before getting a sure foot on my path. You just keep trying and learning and as you get better you will be more in demand.

 

Awesome encouragement Michael, thank you for your support 💖

 

Interesting read, ty!

I've devised non-traditional strategies for getting hiring managers, company owners and influential employees to notice me and grant me a conversation.

This is a very important thing to do for bootcamp grads and other self taught people. It's more difficult to wow without experience or degrees. Even having a crap load of side projects won't necessary do the trick. I've noticed that most recruiters will not take the time to go through side projects to acknowledge the potential quality there. This of course doesn't mean that there should not be side projects in github/bitbucket/other.

One way to demonstrate skill and understanding is to screen capture a coding session with live commentary. Solve a problem in one side project and record it to youtube. I think that doing this played a part in landing my current job.

These are good times to start a career in software development. The demand is so huge. Best of luck to you!

 

Aleksi thanks so much! This advice is money:

One way to demonstrate skill and understanding is to screen capture a coding session with live commentary. Solve a problem in one side project and record it to youtube. I think that doing this played a part in landing my current job.

 

Great advice some hr are not even qualified for the respective field they are interviewing so don't lose hope,keep going!

 

Yes! It's also very frustrating if the first interview is with a person who cannot be convinced with technical knowledge. They may be focused on (lack of) formal education and work experience. Why even bother to interview if this could be already seen from CV?

 

Everyone started like that. It's a matter of luck and persistence. Here is what I suggest:

  • Always get detailed feedback from unsuccessful interviews: So you know what are the potential weaknesses on your profile.
  • Unless not specified put work-from-home assignments on github so you can enhance your CV.
  • Participate in Meetups and coding groups in your area as you can find senior developers who can vouch for you or suggest a path to go.
  • Try to contribute to at least one major Open Source project and mention that in your CV. My favorite tool is issuehub.io/?label%5B%5D=help+want...
 

Theofanis these are great suggestions!

Always get detailed feedback from failed interviews: So you know what are the potential weaknesses on your profile.

Yup this is what I'm doing, though not every hiring manager or recruiter is as forthcoming.

Unless not specified put work-from-home assignments on github so you can enhance your CV.

Yes I have a number of personal projects on my GitHub and I'm adding more.

Participate in Meetups and coding groups in your area as you can find senior developers who can vouch for you or suggest a path to go.

This is a bit tricky for me as I have 2 young children 🤗 and many meetups are at evening hours. However I have a few fantastic dev mentors who have guided my journey greatly.

Try to contribute to at least one major Open Source project and mention that in your CV.

Ooh you know I DONT mention my opensource activity in my resume. I always assumed people would see it in my github lol. I'll do this 👍

 

You can put links on your commit history for each project so the recruiter can jump into the code.

 

You’re well on your way to a long and productive career!

 
 

Thank you for posting this. I'm in a similar situation and feel a range of emotions from self-doubt to anger to disappointment. But I've made it this far and have no choice but to keep pushing through. Like others have mentioned in the comments, I will get a lot of No's but eventually I get a Yes. Good luck in your job search process, I am sure you will find the right company soon enough!

 

Amen Mabel! I'm glad my post helped encourage you :) Which technologies/stacks/frame works are you learning? Maybe we can connect and chat sometime?

 

Fantastic piece and I can totally relate; I can honestly say that I've only very, very seldom succeeded at something new the first time. Rejection is something everything should experience and it sounds like you learned everything you could from it. Again, great piece!

 
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