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Discussion on: Moving your workflow to Linux

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phlash909 profile image
Phil Ashby • Edited

Always a fun topic, thanks Douglas :)

Choosing the path of least pain usually makes sense.. eg: if you deploy on <insert OS here>, it makes little sense developing/testing outside that OS (unless you /like/ fixing bugs in production!), however the isolation provided by virtualisation technologies or containers can allow you to stick with your favourite tooling and still get some value from your tests.

Personally I use a Linux environment given the choice, as I find it a less frustrating experience (ie: package managers that usually work, software written for love not money so not always an MVP/buggy/beta, and the maturity of this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_philosophy), unfortunately I am stuck with Windows on my corporate machine (again):


I've spent many years being annoyed by the fact that in many corporate environments it's the usual policy to supply everyone with a standard Windows machine (with little/no permission to install anything), then ask teams to deploy most of their software to non-Windows servers - eh? Even sillier are the arguments for doing so, usually: 'security', despite placing /way/ more attention on production server (ie: non-Windows) security than desktop or laptop systems; 'central manageability', which usually translates as an ability to trash your stuff accidentally, and in many cases does not scale well. It has much the same issues as a monolith system design, too highly coupled and fragile, and similar solutions: local autonomy (BYOD?), specific services (eg: email, directory services, written policies, auditors), defined security boundaries (eg: federated domains).