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re: Things You Shouldn't Say to a Disabled Person About Why Your App Isn't Accessible VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 
Sloan, the sloth mascot Comment marked as low quality/non-constructive by the community View code of conduct

I don't want to come as an insensitive person, but I won't bother myself with a 10 or 20 percent share of the market when I'm having trouble reaching my original niche. Accessibility is a nice addition, when the developer can afford it. There are however, some accessibility features that are easy to implement without going out of your way. It would be a shame not to include these.

Also, understand that disabilities come in a lot of different ways. You'll eventually have to decide how far you are willing to go to make your software accessible, but you won't be able to satisfy every one. But that doesn't make you evil though. Tell me, do you provide Arabic translation of your software? Are you evil for not including (or bothering to include) people who can't read the languages you support?

Each of us can be considered a minority in some way or another. You'll have to come to terms with this. Try not to think of it as offending, since I doubt anybody wants to hurt you intentionally. That's just how to world works. Limited resources push you to abandon everything not deemed absolutely necessary for immediate success.

 

Someone can learn another language. I can’t train my ears to hear. Not even comparable.

 

I think you should just see yourself out.

 

Seriously, the tone policing is really offensive. Just, don’t.

 
Sloan, the sloth mascot Comment marked as low quality/non-constructive by the community View code of conduct

How many languages do you know? Picking a language is not like picking something off the floor! And you've just excluded me from your audience! I think you are not being inclusive enough! Finally, I've already told you, nobody intends to hurt your feelings, you are being overly sensitive here. You are nobody's victim. I'm just giving you the practical view of things.

Please, stop. You don’t know me or my life. A language barrier is not the same thing as a body that doesn’t function “normally.”

Sloan, the sloth mascot Comment marked as low quality/non-constructive by the community View code of conduct

I don't know you or your life, and this is entirely beyond the point. We are talking about inclusivity here, not about your disability. All I'm saying is that you can't be inclusive enough, but you can sure try. But don't blame the developers that are not making things easier for your kind of disability. I bet they would if they:

  • KNOW about it.
  • Know HOW to handle it.
  • CAN afford handling it.

Even if not for the sake of helping a fellow human being, who wouldn't want the extra traffic? Anyway, I wish you all the best, and I'm sorry if I offended you.

 
Sloan, the sloth mascot Comment marked as low quality/non-constructive by the community View code of conduct

Accessibility, reliability, security, etc., even legal compliance, in some rare cases, are features, by virtue of the simple fact that a product can be deployed and used (albeit with limits) without them.

This is part of why working for a start-up or on a new product with no customer base and no funding is not for the faint of heart.

I think we, as developers, designers, or product managers should welcome, rather than shut down, a discussion of how to handle those trade-offs as part of a product roadmap or which to consider as technical or compliance debt.

Those who want to have to deal with fewer trade-offs or trade-offs they'd consider less "brutal," may have more peace of mind working for a larger company in a more established market. I've made such a move, and I sleep better at night.

But I still have sympathy and respect for those in my professional network who still have to make these hard decisions.

 

You realize you’re talking to a disabled developer, right?

Me being able to use a product is not a feature. I’m a member of your audience and if you don’t have an accessible product I literally can’t use it. Accessibility is not a feature. It’s a need and you need it from the beginning.

I work for a startup. We have TWO engineers. I’m still able to work on accessibility in almost every single frontend task I touch. It’s about effort. None of the points in my post are demonstrating effort to be better, and the comment you’re replying to isn’t demonstrating effort either. There’s no discussion happening.

Accessibility isn’t a hard decision and it’s also not a hard thing to implement. A lot of people would rather complain about how hard it is than sit down and actually do the work and research necessary to be a good developer. Learning about accessibility is no different than learning an API or library you’re adding to an app.

Make sure to check out my recent posts on here for proof. You can build, test, AND document accessible components in a matter of hours. You just have to put work into educating yourself.

Sloan, the sloth mascot Comment marked as low quality/non-constructive by the community View code of conduct

You realize you’re talking to a disabled developer, right?

I'm not talking to you in my comment above, unless I addressed you? Lest you feel put upon, I wanted to write that for anyone reading this comment thread, not you in particular.

Now, Ashlee Boyer, I'll talk to you.

Accessibility isn’t a hard decision and it’s also not a hard thing to implement.

I could easily say this about information security, encryption, or secrets management in particular. "How hard is it to get a valid TLS certificate, or use commonly available password hashing libraries? Update your OS once in a while!"

Do you, Ashlee Boyer, mean to cast aspersions on the ethics of software developers whose product roadmap does not account for potential exclusion of large portions of potential users?

If you want people to respect you or take you seriously, you should probably refrain from being a smartass. And yes, it is unethical to not make your products accessible. 25% of the population is disabled. Good luck getting sued some day. 👍

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