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Discussion on: IIFE's (Immediately-Invoked Function Expressions) in JavaScript Explained in 3 Minutes

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xtrp profile image
Gabriel Romualdo Author

While it can be useful to not have any variables declared on the global scope entirely, variable naming collisions should, to the best of my knowledge, only occur if a global variable has a value assigned to it. Thus, use strict prevents these collisions by preventing the assignment of variables in the global scope.

This is what I meant when I wrote “use strict to prevent the use of global variables”.

— Gabriel

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Eric Ahnell

Oh really? I have assigned script-level variables the initial value of undefined with the intent of initializing them fully inside a later function call, in strict mode, which works just fine. To minimize the opportunity for conflicts, any function-scope variables use one of the ES5 keywords for this purpose in their declarations. Combined with a linter enforcing the rules, I make it as easy as possible to avoid trouble and detect the cause if it happens anyway.

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Mathieu Huot

Hi Fred, I think your article is very well written and it made me review my knowledge about JavaScript strict mode, so thank you for that! Now, it might just be a wording thing but I wanted to clarify that use strict will not prevent the assignment of variables in the global scope, it will only prevent the assignment of undeclared variables.

'use strict';
//The assignment or reassignment of a declared variable will not throw an error.
let globalVariable = 'global value';
globalVariable = 'another value';
//This code will not throw an error.
'use strict';
globalVariable = 'global value';
//This will throw -> ReferenceError: assignment to undeclared variable globalVariable
//Note that if you remove "use strict" it will not throw an error but create a global variable instead.

Here's a reference to what I'm describing in the code block above : developer.mozilla.org/fr/docs/Web/...

You're right that because use strict is preventing the accidental creation of global variables, it reduces the risk of name collision although it doesn't prevent the assignment of a declared variable, global or not. Again, thank you for the learning opportunity!