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Do I count as a "junior developer"?

yujiri8 profile image Ryan Westlund ・1 min read

I try to be cautious with overselling myself. I don't want to call myself a title I haven't earned. Lately I want to know if I qualify as a "junior developer".

I've never passed an interview (I've failed one) - the internship I have now, I didn't have to interview for because let's just say I had connections.

But I've been working as an intern for over two years. I've added features, fixed bugs, done big refactors, helped track down why the prod server keeps crashing, and have been in the paid intern phase for quite a while.

I know about 5 languages fluently: Python, Go, Javascript, Crystal and Unix shell, with medium knowledge of Rust, Haskell, SQL and Julia, and some C. I've done full-stack web development, visual novel development, tracked down bugs in and committed to several open-source projects, and made some open-source projects of my own: Sanemark and Didact.

So can I call myself a junior developer? The main reason I'm unconfident is because I've never passed an interview.

Discussion

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zachiery profile image
Zane WIlliams

Hey! I'm Clifford! I saw your post, and I just wanted to say you'd be counted as a pretty advanced developer. The term "junior developer" is for people who know the basics like how to use html or js for websites, SO Yeah dude your a advanced developer, Have a great day!

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vanaf1979 profile image
VA79 Stephan

I just want to second this. 😊

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yujiri8 profile image
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adam_cyclones profile image
Adam Crockett

Titles are just titles.
Interviews are a different skill to day to day programming, it's unrealistic to measure yourself against a situation that happens once in a blue moon.

I'm a junior sometimes, senior sometimes and Adam others.

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phantas0s profile image
Matthieu Cneude

The titles "junior" or "senior" are nonsense. Somebody without much experience will be called junior by many, even if this somebody is better in some areas than a "senior" with 10+ years of experience. Following a bit what you're doing, it definitely apply to you.

I call myself "software developer". I don't want to be senior, junior, ninja, or anything else. It means that I'm a human who makes mistake like everybody and try to do my best, even if we're doing more alchemy than real science in this industry.

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larbikhounti profile image
mohamed khounti

Il still studying. But 2 years as an intern that a long time you should now be senior and get paid much more

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yujiri8 profile image
Ryan Westlund Author

I don't really believe that. 2 years doesn't seem like that much, especially since I've seen that I still make much longer to get things done than my boss (who has been in the industry for more like 15). (Also I work very few hours, so "2 years" doesn't entail as much experience as it might sound.)