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Discussion on: Why you still love using linux?

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bendman profile image
Ben Duncan

My answer for switching back (to macOS, not windows - for work I value a proper terminal and security to better gaming support) is always that I need a machine where I'm not always fighting to get updates to work, or disappointed by lack of software support. It's been a few years since I've used linux for my main machine though; I'd love to give it another try and see if things have improved!

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xowap profile image
Rémy 🤖

If you go with fancy-pants bleeding-edge distros like Arch or even Ubuntu of course you're going to get into trouble.

But if you try out let's say Debian, it's a very stable and comprehensive OS. Updates are kept to a minimum. And I can do everything I need.

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donnisnoni profile image
Don Alfons Nisnoni Author

@bendman Yeah... you should give another try...BTW What year did you last use linux?

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riidom profile image
riidom

It's good to have some critical view in this thread too :) Let me comment on your points.

I like to separate linux users in two groups: The ones that want to use and the ones who want to learn. I am in the camp who wants to just use linux and not necessarily learn about under-the-surface details. So I strictly stick to newbie-friendly distros (Ubuntu, Kubuntu, others may qualify as well).

Updating haven't been a problem to me, mostly. Most things go by a single click, and reliable. Updating Nvidia drivers involves a few more steps, but nothing difficult (I just sticked to the guide I found in the internet). Some software that comes as appimage or flatpak, I need to update manually. But it rarely takes more than 2 minutes, and the software often notifies me about it.

Software support: Here, the situation of the usual suspects didn't change much over the last years. You want Adobe software, still nope. Native MS Office, still nope. There are probably countless smaller MacOS-only apps you are using - they likely didn't gain linux-support recently.

Of course there are alternatives to each of these, but this depends on how much you are willing to give them a chance. If you use AI and didn't like Inkscape in 2017, you probably still won't like it in 2020 (though it got a good update recently). But, maybe some other contenders popped up in meantime, which you may like more.