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Discussion on: Who Killed The Tab?

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bytebodger profile image
Adam Nathaniel Davis Author

Great points. And yeah... I think the they look the same Everywhere argument sways a lot of people. But that argument also ticks me off. Everything else about modern IDEs is designed to ensure that we can all look at the same code - but we can all view it in a way that is best for each of us. But with spaces, that ability is taken away. It's a nasty brand of arrogance that says, "You must look at this code in the exact same way that I look at it."

I won't repeat a ton of verbiage here, but if you read down a few comments, you'll see where I compared this to code coloring. For some reason, no one thinks it'd be cool to force every dev to read a given code file with the same coloring scheme. (And thank goodness that they don't.) But they think it's perfectly kosher to dictate that we must all read that code with the exact same indentation.

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redhap profile image
HAP • Edited

As a curmudgeonly 50-year-old software engineer, I do like spaces vs tabs. And, yes, I like it because it is consistent. Sometimes I use an IDE. Sometimes I use vi (which I occasionally call six, just to annoy).

But the thing I do find annoying that, more and more, I'm seeing development organizations using prettifiers and reformatters to enforce sameness across code. Thus it becomes annoying when you work on a piece of code just to have a bot either reformat it or wag its finger at you saying it's too complex.

I, for better or worse, feel that it is better for developers to be exposed to more diversity in coding (beyond the whole spaces/tabs thing) as, no matter where you go, you're going to see some differences anyway. Sometimes these differences can help you improve your own code by learning tips and tricks that reformatters are often configured to rewrite.

Ugh. End rant.

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bytebodger profile image
Adam Nathaniel Davis Author • Edited

Sometimes I use vi (which I occasionally call six, just to annoy).

This sentence alone makes me like you.

But the thing I do find annoying that, more and more, I'm seeing development organizations using prettifiers and reformatters to enforce sameness across code.

I mostly agree with you. The only "modification" I'd add is that: I don't mind those tools. If they work for you (or your team), then, great! I only "mind" those tools when I feel that I almost have to use them to work around the other arbitrary rules that have been forced upon us by the standards / style guides.

I, for better or worse, feel that it is better for developers to be exposed to more diversity in coding (beyond the whole spaces/tabs thing) as, no matter where you go, you're going to see some differences anyway. Sometimes these differences can help you improve your own code by learning tips and tricks that reformatters are often configured to rewrite.

Truly, this is a beautiful sentiment. I feel that it kinda falls in line with other things I've blogged about in the past. But I also think it might become its own blog topic in the not-too-distant future.

At some point, in the desperate search for code "quality", people decided that this could be accomplished with slavish conformity and sameness.

But "quality" is more than just ensuring that everyone's code looks like a carbon copy. And... to your point, there are some wonderful "a-ha!" moments to be had when you're perusing someone else's code that isn't "wrong" - but is just a little different from your own.

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v6 profile image
🦄N B🛡

which I occasionally call six, just to annoy

Step your troll game up a level of annoyance and call it eleven. You're welcome.