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Discussion on: You're not worth hiring unless...

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dana94 profile image
Dana Ottaviani

I don't understand the expectation to write on the whiteboard in interviews. I think managers need to understand that the biggest thing to look for in developers to hire is their interest to learn and how they work with others. These 2 factors alone express what a candidate is capable of.

I also wince whenever a company mentions how strongly they value "a very active and healthy GitHub profile" (took this from a job position) when considering a developer. I for one struggled between coding at my last job and the expectation to have all these side projects to show on the side. If someone with that mindset were to see my profile at one point, they would've just made an assumption that I wasn't what they were looking for and dismiss me immediately.

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Jakob Attkinson

Some of us get involved with our jobs more than just "9-to-5" kind of thing. For example, after I started my current job, for about 3 years I was "working" over 12 hours a day. It wasn't requested by the company, but after the 8 hours I would stay in the office with a few collegs, open a beer and discuss for hours our product, changes, impact and so on.
I even went on to restructure the entire operational team, even tho it wasn't part of my job and I wasn't even paid for it.

After those 3 years, any sane human asking to look at my GH profile or any other profile is just crazy. Why would I go home after 8 hours to work on small projects when I could make a real impact at the company I work and I believe in? If that's what they are looking for, I'm pretty sure I'm not a good fit.

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guneyozsan profile image
Guney Ozsan • Edited

This 💩-vision also prevents developers having side projects like building a tree house or making music, which, I think, is more healthy and keeps you refreshed (Unless your biggest hobby is your project on Github).

I would only require a fresh graduate, or a long time not-working developer having personal coding projects. Otherwise I don't find it healthy.

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dana94 profile image
Dana Ottaviani

Yes! I have soooo many more hobbies outside from coding that it's such a struggle sometimes, especially since I'm looking for work now. 😓

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guneyozsan profile image
Guney Ozsan

Good luck with your search.

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dana94 profile image
Dana Ottaviani

Thanks, Guney. 😄

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dyanneo profile image
Dy

I totally get that. It's as if having a job in tech, and tons of experience isn't enough - you HAVE to have dozens of side projects and contributions to open source. Kind of scary for someone who is good at their job, but doesn't want to do this every waking moment.
I've met some ppl who could code really well, but I would never want to be on a team with them (snarky lone wolves).

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Kevin

Good thing I am nearing retirement. I'd never actually use GitHub or contribute to open source. Is that controversial? =P

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andrewbrown profile image
Andrew Brown 🇨🇦 Author • Edited

Just made me think of John Carmack using floppies as their "shared repository" for Doom or something

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olamidehimself

This is literally me. I hate taking on side projects because I have a full-time job and I want to focus on it. It increases my productivity.

What if I leave my current job and apply for somewhere else and they don't pick me because I don't have a lot of "projects"

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codefi profile image
Frank Owusu-Agyemang

I think my current hiring manager was impressed with my YT channel, I have 13 videos on tuts and how-tos dating back to 2015 with over 100k views... I had only internship at my previous job and I was given a fulltime role at my current job... I think hiring managers need to know more of the position.

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Benjamin McMullan

Thats actually the craziest thing about working in our field. You're expected to work on code 9-5 as well as going home and doing more coding. Its like your job is meant to be your hobby, your life. You're effectively meant to increase your value as an employee in your own time without being paid for it.

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db325

I've had that happen to me before.