re: Calling all Full-Stack Haters VIEW POST

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Worth is what you code, not what you know. As a full-stack dev I write lots of applications... On any given day there are over 2000 people are accessing tools that I've written... Websites, form applications, transformed data, database queries, API interfaces... on and on. These tools make their jobs easier and faster.

Example: we had a vendor that offers training to us... (A vendor who has role based devs) "Upgrade" their software. It was a total mess and even after they turned it over as complete several times my QA (I do that too) found errors in the data. When they finally got their code in check there were 5000 training entries to be processed into our HR system that on average take 1 person 1 minute to enter 1 training item.

I have written a process that interfaces with their application, pulls all the training data and then pushes it to our HR application. There's compiled code, database code, an API, an emailer and more all coded by just one person. When it's done it communicates a success and error log to our own training team. Instead of 5000 minutes (80+ hours) of data entry it takes about an hour to pull the training data (mostly waiting on their system while reading) then about 15 seconds to process, store and import into the HR system. This was previously all done by hand.

While 5000 in one shot isn't normal, 1000 is on a once a week basis.

Is there value in a full-stack dev? Ask any user saved from tedious and time consuming mundane tasks that their full-stack dev saved them from and in turned saved $ from the bottom line.

Do I do it all? Yes. Do I hate wearing every hat? Yes. Do I have value? YES.

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