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Discussion on: What would you teach a frontend beginner in 2020?

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ghost profile image
Ghost

Oh, I almost forgot, I have always at hand this as a reminder, probably not the proper language for a course but those ideas are important

motherfuckingwebsite.com/
bettermotherfuckingwebsite.com/
thebestmotherfucking.website/

Maybe may be of inspiration for the closing thoughts of the course. Is always important to remember that the core (HTML, CSS) are designed to be accessible, reactive, fast, and clear. When we forget that we trade those features for aesthetics alone and is easy to forget the purpose in favor of the form.

Not because you can do something, you should.

The rest can be learned online and is forgettable and gets outdated, but if you keep in mind that, I think you'll build a good mindset.

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kayis profile image
K Author

It's an interesting topic.

On the one hand I want to teach the standards on the other hand I also want to teach stuff that finds you a job later, haha.

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ghost profile image
Ghost

I understand, but keep in mind that any specific technology is doomed to be obsolete in a couple of years, and depending how long is their entire curricula, it may even be obsolete just after graduating, yet, the basics are forever (well not forever but you get the point), also what would you prefer to know for working with, lets say React, how to use Angular or have a firm knowledge of JS?, you could teach them how to land 1 specific job, 1 specific tool, how to use 1 specific fishing rod. But specially for a junior dev, flexibility, to me is more important. I don't expect that a new dev knows every single detail of React, what I do hope is that (s)he can learn fast and that is easier with the basics. Also there are plenty of resources to learn frameworks, and learn online is a big part of their career.

What can YOU teach them that is difficult online, what can YOU teach them to help them learn on their own.

What would make them special, differentiate from the competition. I think that, for example, being able to make SQL queries, might be more useful than React when they discover all the jobs are for Angular or vice-versa. If you can teach them what is necessary to pick-up the React tutorial and understand the documentation, that will open a lot of possibilities, if you teach them React it will open just 1 door and close the others. That general understanding, that broad view is hard to get online. And maybe some lean to the design, some closer to the backend or making thicker clients, QA; who knows, I bet even they don't know (even tho they may thing they do).

Said that, after some basics and those "adjacent" topics are taught, I think it would be useful to dig into some framework, to apply the knowledge, maybe contrast VanillaJS to some framework, to teach how a framework can be helpful, improve productivity, avoid boilerplate, etc. But in that context, as just another tool.

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kayis profile image
K Author

Right.

I don't think designers need to know SQL, but I get what you mean.

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ghost profile image
Ghost

yea, I guess that was too much :) but a little SQL never hurt anyone, a friend that is an Industrial engineer always worked in logistics, the closer to a computer was Excel asked me to help him with SQL because he needed some data.

It may not be too related for the curricula but maybe as an advice, a comment or a little assignment, to just check it out, you never know when you'll have to mock or get some data; SQL is almost the command line of data. I'm not talking about normalizing databases or making migrations, but a little peak on SELECT and friends could be useful. I think :)