re: Is it just me or is Microsoft really crushing it lately? VIEW POST

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I've been seeing a lot of developers who have a little bit of experience with JavaScript and Python under their belts becoming interested in getting started with .NET Core.

It's just so much more accessible then .NET Framework was...

There is a bigger learning curve with .NET Core vs. let's say JS though.

You are getting started immediately with a framework (ASP .NET Core for example, which is the .NET Core web framework).

So it's like learning JS but also Express and all the other plugins that you need to build a complete app at the same time.

But there's the rub - you get everything you need in one shot. No need to figure out whether you want Express or some other JS web framework etc.

I think .NET, in general, is viewed as a mature platform for building secure and "solid" production web apps. It's just that it's never been that easy to get started with.

I think MS is making great strides to overcome the view that .NET is just for really big and convoluted enterprise apps.

As a side note that is relevant, this is why I've been building an open source project Coravel. It's directly addressing this issue of "how easy can I just get up-and-running with a production quality .NET Core app?"

It does look like future .NET Core features are targeting bigger players and micro-service scenarios, whereas Coravel is trying to appeal to the indie devs who just want to build one simple yet solid production app quickly.

Another smart thing Microsoft has done, though, is the investment in TypeScript. It was perfectly timed to react (no pun intended) to the rise of JavaScript fatigue and anyone with a bit of TypeScript experience will have a much softer landing in C# than someone coming from PHP, for example.

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