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Discussion on: What's your experience with TailwindCSS?

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natetronn profile image
Nathan Doyle

Not worth being taken seriously? That's like saying Bootstrap isn't worth taking seriously. It's definitely something people should take seriously. Does that mean everyone should use it and nothing else, ever? No, of course not. It's a tool, after all and there is room for more than one tool in one's tool belt and room for different tools on other people's belts too. To each their own, that's what I always say.

For me, I really like it a lot. It fits my "style" (pun and no pun intended.) I don't want a CSS framework to make so many decisions for me but, at the same time, I don't want to have to write CSS over and over again, as I've done that before and it's tedious. Tailwind sits in that sweet spot between too much and too little. It's never in the way and at the same time, it's always there for me when I need it, metaphorically speaking, that is.

The complaint I hear the most is "too many classes in the markup." But this is what I love about it. They are right there where they should be, in my opinion. The classes make a lot of sense, too. And I still have the freedom to use as little or as much as I like. If you know CSS you'll learn Tailwind really fast. Plus, the docs are great when you forget something.

I like a blank slate approach and Tailwind respects that.

Does it fit everyone and every project? Of course not. Will I try to use it with a React Native project even though I know I probably shouldn't and realize it may not be the best tool for the job? Of course I will, because I like it and I want to. But that's me, you do you (or what the boss says, I suppose.)

Tailwind 2.0 looks like a really cool release. I read the whole blog post but, haven't tried it. But I already understand what's available and this without even writing code. It's really that simple, once you've learned it (probably take you a day or less to learn it.)

Anyway, give it a real try on a project and enjoy yourself while doing it. Unless you don't enjoy it, then use something else. That's fine too.

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kwiat1990 profile image
Mateusz Kwiatkowski

Well, I started to use Tailwind recently and I do it mainly with the help of @apply. I think this way of writing classes is better because it doesn't "pollute" HTML with hundreds of classes, which then blow the whole markup. In addition I think it is easier to discover some typo or make a change direct in CSS. But I still use them in HTML, where it makes sens for me.

Generally I think Tailwind with the entire customization and PurgeCSS is a great way to deal with CSS in a project.

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natetronn profile image
Nathan Doyle

For sure. And with Tailwind v2.0 they've made it easier to do just that:

blog.tailwindcss.com/tailwindcss-v...