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Discussion on: Switching To linux

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oshankkashyap profile image
Oshank Kashyap

Hello sir!
The thing you are talking about is nuinsance. You are saying that Linux also gets slow after time.
This not the case, I'm using ubuntu 18.04.2 since April 2019, i do face some issues but the performace haven't dropped till now. I have vmware installed on that thing, blender (learning some 3d modelling), steam games and many others software which require some good amount of horse power. I use some scripts at startup which does make it a little bit slow at startup, but when they are finished loading the performace return back to normal.

And if you talk about Windows and Android. Those things have many applications and services running in the background. Linux only runs services which are required it to run properly, and you can also check which services and applications are running, not like windows and android where you can't see those services, and can even terminate them if you like.

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jhilgeman profile image
Jonathan H

No, I am saying that the performance -can- drop in Linux if you use it the same way that people often use Windows. People often install lots of things without any regard to the side effects.

For example, I've logged into a less-experienced admin's Linux web server, only to find a bunch of desktop services running that did not need to be installed. The admin had used a package manager to install a graphics library package, which had one dependency that triggered many other dependencies, including the whole X11 system, which was now starting up at boot and taking up valuable resources even though it wasn't even used. The admin was trying out something but didn't end up needing it, but he left it installed and running. On top of that, he hadn't disabled the unnecessary services like Bluetooth, so there were a few of those running for no reason, too.

Performance is not usually killed by one or two major things - it is an accumulation of very small things.

If you know what you're doing with Linux, you won't see performance drop. If you know what you're doing with Windows, you also won't see performance drop.

One last note:

not like windows and android where you can't see those services...

You can see every service and process on Windows. In fact, Windows.10 makes it even easier to see what processes map to which services.

Android tries harder to shield the user from the services but your average user doesn't even bother much with processes anyway. If Linux desktop became mainstream-popular tomorrow, you would see new app stores for Linux popping up everywhere, filled with games and apps that contain ads and their own copies of libraries, and apps that run in the background. And people wouldn't care until their system got slow and then they'd complain that Linux is slow.

My.point was not that Linux gets slow - it's that bad user practices will make the operating system slow no matter if it's Windows or Linux or Mac or whatever.

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oshankkashyap profile image
Oshank Kashyap

I agree with you, sir.
People usually don't care about what they are running inside their machines and complain that the os is slow. Even I use windows. I usually don't feel any hiccups when using it (but It feels slow after an update).

I know that you can kill and see services in Windows. That line was for Android only.
Thanks for your reply
And, sorry for my aggressiveness :)

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jhilgeman profile image
Jonathan H

No worries. Aggressiveness is pretty common when talking about Linux and Windows. :)

FWIW, I think updates are definitely smoother in Linux than in Windows. Windows has had a pretty rough time trying to get them right and it's still not perfect.