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Discussion on: A future without time zones

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qwertydude profile image
Chris Howard

As a dev, I like the idea.

But you still have time "zones" and many don't neatly align with hours. e.g. in Australia, the eastern states are 30 mins ahead of the central states and 2 hours ahead of the west.

So, if I went from Melbourne to Adelaide, I'd need to know that everything is 1/2 hour out of sync to what I'm used to. So, although my watch would say the same time, the onus is on me to remember the 30 min difference and its affects.

The idea obviously makes it much easier us devs, but for travellers I'm not so sure.

And at least in the daytime we'd have the sun to give us a sense of what period in the day it is. But at night... landing at 13:00/1PM in Melbourne, without researching, would you know if it's time to go to bed, or nearly time to get up?

Why make every single traveller research that when the current system, knowing that it's 10PM, makes that immediately clear?

So, in the end, I think people would baulk at this idea as it puts the onus on them to research about local times when travelling, instead of the current universal time system where 22:00/10PM is night time where ever you are, and 12:00 is lunch time.

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isaacdlyman profile image
Isaac Lyman Author

I think the half-hour and quarter-hour time zones ideally would die out.

Yes, it would make traveling a little more difficult. Airports and train stations, and maybe even "Welcome to Quebec" signs, would post business hour short codes to help travelers get oriented.

Still, travel is harder. And communication is easier. Personally I do more of the latter.