re: The Benefits You Need to Know about Infrastructure as Code VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

The problem is getting more apparent every year.

We're introducing more and more abstraction layers on top of physical infrastructure, making compromises, generalizing and reducing use cases to most common ones creating bottlenecks and slowdowns ignoring special requirements.

Instead of physical infrastructure we have hypervisors, running virtualized OS-es with virtualized hardware that run containers that run frameworks that transpile to intermediate languages that are translated to binary code that gets executed.
Instead of switches and routers we have SDNs that execute on CPUs sharing execution with all cloud customers. No wonder they do not ofer any SLA on the bandwidth, it's impossible to keep it!

You want cloud? For the price you get average performance shared with tons of other cloud customers, no options to resolve resource contention or hardware overutilization or any other random slowdown you experience.

They claim power efficiency, performance and internet speed has increased several ten folds over past years. I hardly noticed webpages or mobile apps loading any faster.

Are you wondering why you need new computer each time new version of Windows comes out? Shouldn't they finaly manage to fix all performance issues and make everything run smooth? Especially when SSDs now reach 5x the speed of traditional HDDs? When we have 8-16x more memory than we used to have? When we have 4-8x more CPU cores than before?

Where does all the power go?

 

Not everything you said is truth. What you described as a cloud is commonly known as public cloud and you share resources with other tenants.

But then there's private cloud where tenant will be given its own resources that won't be shared with anyone else.

Also, public cloud is far more performant for cloud provider because they can use hardware more efficiently by not having it idle.

 

But then there's private cloud where tenant will be given its own resources that won't be shared with anyone else.

You get your resources that may not be shared with anyone else - while at the same time they are far from being neither performant nor flexible.

You get the same cheap CPUs bought for public cloud because their ROI is so fast (lot of core count, small caches, low frequencies) you get one fixed storage of unknown configuration that will 100% not suit your use case. You will be lucky if it's SAS based, in most cases it's NLSAS OR staight SATA. You luckily may get your own RAID controller with some cache but no control over read/write ratio. In most cases tho, you get shared NAS with other tennants because that's where they invested tons of money and they need to monetize on it.
Then you get a network connectivity. That's also shared. Not only with tennants but while doing your backups it will cut from it. If you're lucky they did invest into dedicated NIC for NAS connectivity.

How is that better than public cloud? It is simply not!

 

Whoa there Slavius, what are you so mad about? Your your profile says you are " Currently working as a freelancer on infrastructure, application architecture and cloud engineering."; but then you dig into them like it's going out of style. What's up? It's like you know the differences, but run away from the reasons.

We're introducing more and more abstraction layers on top of physical infrastructure...
Are you suggesting we just write in binary? or maybe you are just a functional purist who likes to rewrite the same functionality over thousands of times?

Instead of physical infrastructure we have hypervisors...
Yes, and that's good. Lets see the difference in time between purchasing your hardware, renting racks, getting auth, scheduling a time at the DC and installing 1000 servers. Compared to someone in the cloud spinning them up in an hour.

Instead of switches and routers we have SDNs that execute on CPUs sharing execution with all cloud customers.
So? Do you think cloud providers are the first to have SDNs? Anyhow, it's far easier to rebuild your network topology in an SDN than it is by hand. Also, want to duplicate it?...click, click, click; done.

They claim power efficiency, performance and internet speed has increased several ten folds over past years. I hardly noticed webpages or mobile apps loading any faster.
These two have nothing in common to compare for, you shouldn't. If you "notice" that website A is slow, did you also notice that it was slow yesterday ? did you track that? did you notice if you had five other tabs open or ten ? did you notice if you visited the same pages? did you notice if they changed their web servers? did you notice a change in speed from a third party resource on the html page you are looking at? Did you notice they have an over utilized server?

Are you wondering why you need new computer each time new version of Windows comes out?
No. I know why, if you have to buy a new computer when the new OS comes out, it's because the hardware you purchased back then, is no longer good enough to run their newer code which has been designed to run on more powerful hardware. it's like you are trolling or maybe you just are just so blinded by the topic, what the heck does Windows have to do with any of this anyways?

I'm not sure what upset you so much from an IAC article to begin lamenting and ranting about all of this with your ill-informed opinion. Please have yourself a better day/week/year fam.

 
Sloan, the sloth mascot Comment marked as low quality/non-constructive by the community View code of conduct

I'm unfortunately not interested to reply to your comment for obvious reasons - you are part of a cult and I don't buy it.

You are the one ill-informed. I am long term cloud end-user, renting physical servers and several years working as part of cloud provider company. I have my reasons to write what I write and those are facts I face every day.

Good day, sir!

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