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Discussion on: Which programming language should you learn in 2020?

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aminmansuri profile image
hidden_dude

Indeed ratings:

  1. Go: 2,179 jobs (unfortunate name makes it hard to measure)
  2. Rust: 1,535 jobs
  3. Elixir: 521 jobs
  4. JS: 58,524 jobs
  5. Python: 75,337 jobs (WARNING: take with grain of salt, many jobs say "scripting languages such as.." and include python)
  6. Java: 72,380 jobs
  7. Ruby: 16,469 jobs
  8. Scala: 7,218 jobs
  9. Clojure: 431 jobs
  10. Kotlin: 2,049 jobs

One missing addition should be C# with 32,498 jobs.

So your list varies wildly in terms of "domination".. but of course Tiobe intends to measure growth trends. Indeed mainly is correlated how many unfilled jobs there are right now (ie. its an indicator of unfulfilled demand).

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brainbuzzer profile image
Aditya Giri Author

Yeah. I had originally written it as a piece under title "Top trending programming languages of 2019". But then due to less reach, I had to change the title.

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aminmansuri profile image
hidden_dude

What would be cool is to see what truly original languages there are in 2019.

Most of these commercial languages don't seem much different than their historical ancestors.
Most of what's here could be covered with a study of Smalltalk and Lisp and maybe one other language.

No real weird stuff. No parallelism, nothing truly new. Nothing weird like Haskell or Prolog. Nothing really brave like Smalltalk.

Someone once said that computer language innovation ended in 1980. I'm not sure that's exactly true, but a loss less innovation has appeared since then. Most of this list are rehashes from the past. I don't gain much learning how to write a for loop in a different language, or a mapcar/reduce.

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aminmansuri profile image
hidden_dude

Elixir seems most interesting of the bunch.

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brainbuzzer profile image
Aditya Giri Author

Yeah, Elixir is one of the most effective languages among all these.

And also, thanks for that tip. I've been following a bunch of different languages like V Lang, Nim, and Zig. I'd definitely be writing an article on it.

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davidwhit profile image
DavidWhit

Yes, but my two cents believes you can really do anything big or small with rust bolting on what you want to make it the language to suite your needs. I also think Rust provides a modern approach to low level programming. I only spent 3months looking into elixir and it was ok just not for me the OTP model still feels foreign. The Beam and erlang behind the scenes I'm also unfamiliar. I might be wrong but I feel its place is niche. Though as always pick what you like and go with it and dismiss others opinions.