re: Learning to love software development books 💙 VIEW POST

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re: After reading POODR and doing some research I realized that actually there are many great books that don't get outdated instantaneously. This is ...
 

Great points, David.
I also found it useful to read books on fundamental topics (like oop, patterns, fp, ddd) applied to the languages I use. It helps a lot to get into the topic and start using what I've learned.
Of course, I don't limit myself to only books using "my" languages, especially when getting familiar with the topic.

 

It's true! I'm not at all experienced with Java, C#, Python, C and C++ - but I find it really important to be able to read those languages just to understand code examples in books.

Especially Java - it's like a lingua franca for developers. Still hate it though 😁.

(I wasn't going to mention DDD, but since you did: I find the Eric Evans book amazing even though I can never manage to finish it...)

Can relate :D I'm currently reading "Working Effectively with Legacy Code" by Michael Feathers and it's full of examples in Java and C++ (and I'm a rubyist). So Java is the easier one :)

As for the DDD, I have one of the big DDD books in paper (not the Evans' one) and am not sure if I'll ever finish it, but I do read bits of it from time to time. Another problem is that it's in Russian and I have to sometimes search the terms to find out what the translator meant and if the translation is correct.
I found useful to read at least "DDD quickly" to get into the topic. There's also a book "DDD distilled".

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