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Discussion on: Did you know that Oracle owns the trademark to Javascript?

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theoutlander profile image
Nick Karnik Author

I was thinking about that since it didn't mention anywhere that Oracle asked for it to be taken down.

Why do you say Oracle cannot use it anymore?

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link2twenty profile image
Andrew Bone

I think it would be indefensible, that being said IE's interpretation of ECMAScript was called JScript specifically to avoid a fight.

'Javascript' has been trademarked since Netscape introduced it, 23 years ago.

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theoutlander profile image
Nick Karnik Author

True. Although, Sun owned the trademark. I don't know if it had purchased Netscape and inherited it.

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link2twenty profile image
Andrew Bone

Looks like they introduced it together.

tech-insider.org/java/research/199...

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theoutlander profile image
Nick Karnik Author

Good find. That is internet gold! I didn’t know that part of JavaScript’s history. I guess it was a couple of years before I got into web development.

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picocreator profile image
Eugene Cheah • Edited

There would be arguable grounds that the trademark term has been "Genericide". However until it is proven in court, its not official.

Its a situation, where a trademark has gain such popularity and dominance over a term, that its trademark will no longer apply. Allowing even their competitors to use the same term, like almost every other english term in the dictionary.

Some well known example would be

  • Dumpster
  • Thermos
  • Hovercraft
  • Dry Ice
  • Heroine

These were actual trade mark terms that gotten so popular, they have lost their trademarks.

This is actually part of the reason why you would see "Google" putting their name on a 101 products, because some would argue "Google" has come to mean "Online Search" and hence no longer a trademark. While on the other hand, Google would argue it doesnt just mean search, but a 101 other different things and hence still a trademark. (Legals 🤷)

This is a very complicated legal topic, and Wiki would have a much more elaborate explanation : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generic_trad...

So if im guessing, I would bet Oracle wouldn't sue over such a term, as it would just open a can of worms of it potentially being generalized.

Disclaimer : I am not a lawyer