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Discussion on: What If Swift Didn't Exist?

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

The complaints about the way interop is done seem to not take into account the other goodies Swift brings to the table. I, for one, don't see how a TypeScript approach would lead to a pleasant experience.

I have only done toy iOS development, but I certainly see the appeal of a language with a more mainstream syntax and a fresh take on some of the problems iOS devs might face.

@kaydacode You're about the biggest Swift fan I can think of. Thoughts here?

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kaydacode profile image
Kim Arnett 

Thanks for the tag Ben :)

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kaydacode profile image
Kim Arnett 

..cracks knuckles..

It really boils down to Objective C being extremely outdated.. and is/has been a big turn off for new or aspiring Apple devs. There will be a day when Swift has stabilized (which some argue it's begun) and Obj-C won't be accepted by Apple anymore. They've made that pretty clear as a goal. The problem is the really big apps in the App Store are slowly migrating.. and you can't kill off supporting your biggest players until they're fully converted.

Swift is a breath of fresh air and certainly is a game changer. Vapor puts Swift on the Server, Some other plugin supports Android development.. there's a lot of power here. It's friendly syntax and familiarity to JS devs is what will keep pulling developers into the Apple ecosystem.

I'm sure there's a list of pros and cons for both.. but bottom line, Apple's made it clear this is a goal.. so I would be learning it if you haven't already. :)

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rhymes

Hi Kim,

let me add a disclaimer: I know nothing about mobile development so I might be saying stuff that doesn't make sense :D

I read something about the biggest issue of bringing Swift to Android being that it can only talk to the Android NDK which is not exactly "primo" software.

By the power of Google I also just found out you can use Kotlin on iOS: albertgao.xyz/2018/01/14/how-to-cr...

Either option would probably help companies that have to rewrite the core business logic of their apps twice because of these two silos. I see it done by clients of mine, they have bugs, that could be totally avoided, in either one of the two apps because they have to write the same functionality twice by different teams.

The dream probably would be to have a core team of devs trained in either Kotlin or Swift to write the core of the app and then a specialized team to "wire" the core to the UI.

Does it make sense?

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kaydacode profile image
Kim Arnett  • Edited

Sure, I'm not a fan of shared codebase because it usually results in one platform getting the short straw in some way shape or form.

But there is a lot of power available, and I'm excited to see how both languages evolve. It would be great if Apple and Google could get along to make something like one language work seamlessly on both platforms.. but Apple doesn't play nice, so I'm sure it'll only ever be accommodated by 3rd party work around which usually end up pretty hacky.

I Have A Dream

:)

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rhymes profile image
rhymes

Yeah, I think Apple and Google getting along on this might be science fiction. On the surface neither company benefits from making the two platforms interoperable.