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Understanding ngrx/component-store debounceSync()

scooperdev profile image Stephen Cooper ・5 min read

In the previous post we looked at the debounce option for @ngrx/component-store selectors and how it changes their behaviour. In this post we look at the code that makes this possible and figure out how it works.

The code is located here in NgRx and can also be found in rxjs-etc where it was originally created by Nicholas Jamieson. As it is published with the MIT license and all conditions are fulfilled by NgRx they are able to avoid having an extra dependency here.

Selector Debouncing

Inside the select method of component-store is the following line of code. This takes our debounce config value and either adds the debounceSync() operator or returns the original source with no change.

this.stateSubject$.pipe(
     config.debounce ? debounceSync() : (source$) => source$,
     map(projector)
);

What is this debounceSync() operator doing?

The debounceSync() code

Below is the code for debounceSync(). When I first looked at this I had no idea what was going on! So I reached for our trusty friend console.log and started experimenting in Stackblitz. You can try this too here.

export function debounceSync<T>(): MonoTypeOperatorFunction<T> {
  return source =>
    new Observable<T>(observer => {
      let actionSubscription: Subscription | undefined;
      let actionValue: T | undefined;
      const rootSubscription = new Subscription();
      rootSubscription.add(
        source.subscribe({
          complete: () => {
            console.log("COMPLETE", { actionSubscription, actionValue });
            if (actionSubscription) {
              observer.next(actionValue);
            }
            observer.complete();
          },
          error: error => {
            console.log("ERROR", { actionSubscription });
            observer.error(error);
          },
          next: value => {
            console.log("NEXT", { actionSubscription, value });
            actionValue = value;
            if (!actionSubscription) {
              actionSubscription = asapScheduler.schedule(() => {
                console.log("ASAP", { actionSubscription, actionValue });
                observer.next(actionValue);
                actionSubscription = undefined;
              });
              rootSubscription.add(actionSubscription);
            }
          }
        })
      );
      return rootSubscription;
    });
}

To run the code I setup two streams. One uses interval to be asynchronous and the other uses from to run synchronously.

console.warn("Before interval");

interval(1).pipe(
  debounceSync(),
  take(3)
).subscribe(val => console.log("interval", val));

console.warn("Before from");

from([10, 20, 30]).pipe(
  debounceSync()
).subscribe(val => console.log("fromArray", val));

console.warn("After From");

This along with the logging I added into the debounceSync() function gave me the following output.

Console Output

The first thing to notice is that the interval code does not appear between the Before interval and Before from. This is because this interval code is running asynchronously. What's more interesting is that it appears right at the end, even after our fromArray code! This demonstrates how synchronous code is executed before asynchronous and that Observables can run synchronously.

This behaviour comes down to the Event Loop. If you are not familiar with the Event loop it would be worth reading this fantastic article to learn more before carrying on. (It even has animations to demonstrate it!)

The Differences

If we compare the two outputs we get an idea of what the code is doing. On the left we have the synchronously from stream and on the right the asynchronous interval stream.

Log output, asynchronous code logs ASAP

In both cases the first value comes in and as the actionSubscription is undefined it creates one. This actionSubscription uses the asapScheduler to register its call-back method.

asapScheduler: Perform task as fast as it can be performed asynchronously

In the call-back it passes the value to the next observer in the chain and also clears the current actionSubscription.

next: value => {
   console.log("NEXT", { actionSubscription, value });
   actionValue = value;
   if (!actionSubscription) {
       actionSubscription = asapScheduler.schedule(() => {
           console.log("ASAP", { actionSubscription, actionValue });
           observer.next(actionValue);
           actionSubscription = undefined;
       });
       rootSubscription.add(actionSubscription);
   }
}

Synchronous

With a fully synchronous event stream the actionSubscription never gets to fire. This is because all the synchronous events are on the call stack and these must be executed before the asapScheduler can run. So any new values just update the internal actionValue without being passed to the next observer.

As we are using the from operator it completes synchronously after the 3 values are emitted and before the asapScheduler has the chance to run. This is why the complete method checks for the existence of an outstanding actionSubscription and if it is defined it then emits the current actionValue to the observer before completing. Without this check no values would be emitted.

complete: () => {
    if (actionSubscription) {
        observer.next(actionValue);
    }
    observer.complete();
},

Note with the synchronous code only the last value actually gets emitted. This is why this function is called debounceSync because it debounces synchronous events.

Asynchronous

With the asynchronous events we see that every value gets emitted via the actionSubscription. This is because the asapScheduler will get the opportunity to run between the asynchronous interval events. Each time the asapScheuler fires the current actionSubscription is cleared so the the next value will also setup a new actionSubscription to enable that to be emitted via the call-back too.

Summary

The debounceSync() operator works by recording each new event in a local variable actionValue which will only be emitted when the observable completes or after the call stack has been cleared (all synchronous events have completed). The asynchronous call-back uses the asapScheduler to keep any introduced delay to a minimum.

After writing this article the following section in the docs makes a lot more sense to me.

Sometimes the preferred behaviour would be to wait (or debounce) until the state "settles" (meaning all the changes within the current microtask occur) and only then emit the final value.

Multiple Selectors

At this point it is worth noting that as long as all the events are synchronous you may find that debouncing enables feedback loops in selectors to stabalize before emitting. Our example has not covered this use case but it is the main advantage of debouncing selectors as I see it.

Alternative Implementation

This function is equivalent to using the debounceTime operator with a delay value of 0 setup with the asapScheduler.

debounceTime(0, asapScheduler)

Alex Okrushko, from the NgRx core team, said that this was the first thought for synchronous debouncing however this has the side effect of creating extra timers that are not required for this specific behaviour. Nicholas Jamieson suggested to use this custom operator, debounceSync which he created to ensure the best possible performance for the NgRx Component Store.

Further Reading

I learnt a lot about this feature from the NgRx Discord channel which you should definitely join if you have not already!

Posted on by:

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Stephen Cooper

@scooperdev

Senior Engineer @G-Research. Writing and speaking about Angular and web tech.

Discussion

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Was waiting for this second post, great job breaking it down!