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Discussion on: Learn a New Language: Ruby or Go?

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cleysonlb profile image
Cleyson Leal Braga

Golang... becouse Ruby is dying

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itachiuchiha profile image
Itachi Uchiha

Is there any proof? For example, the lowest commit counts can be an example. You can say there are tons of issues that haven't closed yet, etc.

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talentlessguy profile image
v 1 r t l

but you currently use a site written in Ruby...

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cleysonlb profile image
Cleyson Leal Braga

Last update: 17 months ago
My old site :p
Everything I said does not mean that I am against ruby ​​... the language is nothing more than a tool, be it ruby, go, python, any language you learn will add you, my vision is in relation to the market, I worked with ruby for 3 years ... today if you are going to study for the market, I would say to study javascript, but if you are going to learn by learning, anybody will add you.

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citizen428 profile image
Michael Kohl

My old site :p

He was talking about DEV, which is a Rails app.

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deciduously profile image
Ben Lovy

[citation needed]

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cleysonlb profile image
Cleyson Leal Braga

Most companies are migrating from ruby ​​to Elixir, ruby ​​has gained fame because of rails, but nowadays there are several other development alternatives as good, including using node

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ludamillion profile image
Luke Inglis

Most companies are migrating from ruby ​​to Elixir

[citation needed]

I keep hearing that but I have never seen anything indicating that most companies are doing this. I've seen a little more evidence that companies are choosing Elixir (or something else) over Ruby/Rails for greenfield projects. But to imply that most companies are actively migrating legacy apps to Elixir is a big assertion to make without evidence.

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thepeoplesbourgeois profile image
Josh

My experience has been that Ruby-embracing companies have done very little, if anything, to attempt to transition over to Elixir, for either greenfield or legacy established codebases. Even given the familiar syntax and strong guarantees of concurrency, performance, stability, and flexibility, there's an incredible inertia within teams that have already built up their Rails projects.

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ghost profile image
Ghost

I think this is usually a moot discussion because it depends on the local market, we are working all over the world, in some places Ruby may be dying while in others is growing, in some maybe never arrived, it also depends in the circle we operate, even the specific industry we tend to focus. We probably will think our current stack is more popular because of course we have more people surrounding us using it, we probably look for job offers that favors what we know and use, for obvious reasons. Of course to me Java looks less popular, I hate it, I don't even look at job offerings that require Java, so I have less chances to talk with Java people, I don't go to their Meetups nor watch Java YT videos, that doesn't mean is less popular, no idea. And even if it where, that just tells me that is less popular in my city, in the industries I'm closest to, nothing more.

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deciduously profile image
Ben Lovy

Every link here suggests the opposite of what you're asserting. Even the graph showing it on the bottom of those four tools shows it has remained steady, not declined.

No, Ruby isn't poised to ever replace or even compete with C++ or JavaScript, but there's also nothing to indicate it's going anywhere for a long, long time. Yes, there are some companies that are migrating to Elixir, but I haven't seen anything suggesting that "most" companies are doing so is accurate. Instead, Ruby is continuing to mature and has a very well defined niche in the industry. The fact that many large systems (like GitHub, or DEV, AirBNB, Stripe, etc, etc.) continue to use it. Rails is declining, but Rails is not all of Ruby, and both Rails and Ruby continue to receive active ongoing development both in terms of core tools and ecosystem. It can both be alive and well and not the #1 language on ranking lists. There's gonna be Ruby to maintain for a long time, and on top of that there's still brand new Ruby code churning out too.

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cleysonlb profile image
Cleyson Leal Braga

In your argument you are defending legacy code ... it is the same as saying that PHP is growing because the internet uses wordpress, and saying that PHP is a great choice for 2020

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deciduously profile image
Ben Lovy

I don't know that I'm trying to mount a defence, just observing. Ruby has been "dying" since like 2007 but still has yet to actually get around to it, and I don't think anything is different now except that the language itself is much, much stronger than it ever was back then. I try not to feel too strongly one way or another about these things on a personal level, it's all just tools for a job. Ruby is a pretty good tool, I don't think it's accurate to say that Ruby suffers from the same inherent issues as PHP for greenfield development.

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sergix profile image
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citizen428 profile image
Michael Kohl

That's fine, it's been "dying" every year since 2012 and yet here I am, still earning my living with it after 15 years.

isrubydead.com/