loading...
Cover image for 39+ Advanced React Interview Questions (SOLVED) You Must Clarify (2020 Update)
FullStack.Cafe

39+ Advanced React Interview Questions (SOLVED) You Must Clarify (2020 Update)

aershov24 profile image Alex 👨🏼‍💻FullStack.Cafe Originally published at fullstack.cafe Updated on ・18 min read

The average React Js Developer salary in USA is $125,000 per year or $64.10 per hour. Entry level positions start at $63,050 per year while most experienced workers make up to $195,000 per year. Follow along to learn most advanced React Interview Questions for your next tech interview.

🔴 Originally published on FullStack.Cafe - Kill Your Tech & Coding Interview

Q1: What is virtual DOM?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐

The virtual DOM (VDOM) is an in-memory representation of Real DOM. The representation of a UI is kept in memory and synced with the “real” DOM. It’s a step that happens between the render function being called and the displaying of elements on the screen. This entire process is called reconciliation.

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q2: What are the differences between a class component and functional component?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐

  • Class components allows you to use additional features such as local state and lifecycle hooks. Also, to enable your component to have direct access to your store and thus holds state.

  • When your component just receives props and renders them to the page, this is a stateless component, for which a pure function can be used. These are also called dumb components or presentational components.

🔗 Source: github.com/Pau1fitz

Q3: What are refs used for in React?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐

Refs are an escape hatch which allow you to get direct access to a DOM element or an instance of a component. In order to use them you add a ref attribute to your component whose value is a callback function which will receive the underlying DOM element or the mounted instance of the component as its first argument.

class UnControlledForm extends Component {
  handleSubmit = () => {
    console.log("Input Value: ", this.input.value)
  }
  render () {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <input
          type='text'
          ref={(input) => this.input = input} />
        <button type='submit'>Submit</button>
      </form>
    )
  }
}

Above notice that our input field has a ref attribute whose value is a function. That function receives the actual DOM element of input which we then put on the instance in order to have access to it inside of the handleSubmit function.

It’s often misconstrued that you need to use a class component in order to use refs, but refs can also be used with functional components by leveraging closures in JavaScript.

function CustomForm ({handleSubmit}) {
  let inputElement
  return (
    <form onSubmit={() => handleSubmit(inputElement.value)}>
      <input
        type='text'
        ref={(input) => inputElement = input} />
      <button type='submit'>Submit</button>
    </form>
  )
}

🔗 Source: github.com/Pau1fitz

Q4: Describe how events are handled in React.

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐

In order to solve cross browser compatibility issues, your event handlers in React will be passed instances of SyntheticEvent, which is React’s cross-browser wrapper around the browser’s native event. These synthetic events have the same interface as native events you’re used to, except they work identically across all browsers.

What’s mildly interesting is that React doesn’t actually attach events to the child nodes themselves. React will listen to all events at the top level using a single event listener. This is good for performance and it also means that React doesn’t need to worry about keeping track of event listeners when updating the DOM.

🔗 Source: tylermcginnis.com

Q5: What is the difference between state and props?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐

Both props and state are plain JavaScript objects. While both of them hold information that influences the output of render, they are different in their functionality with respect to component. i.e,

  • Props get passed to the component similar to function parameters
  • state is managed within the component similar to variables declared within a function.

🔗 Source: https://github.com/sudheerj

Q6: How to create refs?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐

Refs are created using React.createRef() method and attached to React elements via the ref attribute. In order to use refs throughout the component, just assign the ref to the instance property with in constructor.

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.myRef = React.createRef();
  }
  render() {
    return <div ref={this.myRef} />;
  }
}

And:

class UserForm extends Component {
  handleSubmit = () => {
    console.log("Input Value is: ", this.input.value)
  }
  render () {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <input
          type='text'
          ref={(input) => this.input = input} /> // Access DOM input in handle submit
        <button type='submit'>Submit</button>
      </form>
    )
  }
}

We can also use it in functional components with the help of closures.

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q7: What are Higher-Order components?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐

A higher-order component (HOC) is a function that takes a component and returns a new component. Basically, it’s a pattern that is derived from React’s compositional nature
We call them as “pure’ components” because they can accept any dynamically provided child component but they won’t modify or copy any behavior from their input components.

const EnhancedComponent = higherOrderComponent(WrappedComponent);

HOC can be used for many use cases as below,

  1. Code reuse, logic and bootstrap abstraction
  2. Render High jacking
  3. State abstraction and manipulation
  4. Props manipulation

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q8: What is the purpose of using super constructor with props argument?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐

A child class constructor cannot make use of this reference until super() method has been called. The same applies for ES6 sub-classes as well. The main reason of passing props parameter to super() call is to access this.props in your child constructors.

Passing props:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        console.log(this.props);  // Prints { name: 'sudheer',age: 30 }
    }
}

Not passing props:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super();
        console.log(this.props); // Prints undefined
        // But Props parameter is still available
        console.log(props); // Prints { name: 'sudheer',age: 30 }
    }

    render() {
        // No difference outside constructor
        console.log(this.props) // Prints { name: 'sudheer',age: 30 }
    }
}

The above code snippets reveals that this.props behavior is different only with in the constructor. It would be same outside the constructor.

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q9: What are controlled components?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

In HTML, form elements such as <input>, <textarea>, and <select> typically maintain their own state and update it based on user input. When a user submits a form the values from the aforementioned elements are sent with the form. With React it works differently. The component containing the form will keep track of the value of the input in it's state and will re-render the component each time the callback function e.g. onChange is fired as the state will be updated. An input form element whose value is controlled by React in this way is called a controlled component.

🔗 Source: github.com/Pau1fitz

Q10: What is equivalent of the following using React.createElement?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

Question:

const element = (
  <h1 className="greeting">
    Hello, world!
  </h1>
);

What is equivalent of the following using React.createElement?

Answer:

const element = React.createElement(
  'h1',
  {className: 'greeting'},
  'Hello, world!'
);

🔗 Source: github.com/Pau1fitz

Q11: What can you tell me about JSX?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

When Facebook first released React to the world, they also introduced a new dialect of JavaScript called JSX that embeds raw HTML templates inside JavaScript code. JSX code by itself cannot be read by the browser; it must be transpiled into traditional JavaScript using tools like Babel and webpack. While many developers understandably have initial knee-jerk reactions against it, JSX (in tandem with ES2015) has become the defacto method of defining React components.

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    let props = this.props;  
    return (
      <div className="my-component">
      <a href={props.url}>{props.name}</a>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

🔗 Source: codementor.io

Q12: Given the code defined above, can you identify two problems?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

Take a look at the code below:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    // set the default internal state
    this.state = {
      clicks: 0
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    this.refs.myComponentDiv.addEventListener('click', this.clickHandler);
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    this.refs.myComponentDiv.removeEventListener('click', this.clickHandler);
  }

  clickHandler() {
    this.setState({
      clicks: this.clicks + 1
    });
  }

  render() {
    let children = this.props.children;

    return (
      <div className="my-component" ref="myComponentDiv">
      <h2>My Component ({this.state.clicks} clicks})</h2>
      <h3>{this.props.headerText}</h3>
    {children}
    </div>
    );
  }
}

Given the code defined above, can you identify two problems?

Answer:

  1. The constructor does not pass its props to the super class. It should include the following line:
constructor(props) {
  super(props);
  // ...
}
  1. The event listener (when assigned via addEventListener()) is not properly scoped because ES2015 doesn’t provide autobinding. Therefore the developer can re-assign clickHandler in the constructor to include the correct binding to this:
constructor(props) {
  super(props);
  this.clickHandler = this.clickHandler.bind(this);
  // ...
}

🔗 Source: codementor.io

Q13: Why should not we update the state directly?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

If you try to update state directly then it won’t re-render the component.

    //Wrong
    This.state.message =Hello world;

Instead use setState() method. It schedules an update to a component’s state object. When state changes, the component responds by re-rendering

    //Correct
    This.setState({message: Hello World});

Note: The only place you can assign the state is constructor.

🔗 Source: https://github.com/sudheerj

Q14: What are the different phases of ReactJS component lifecycle?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

There are four different phases of React component’s lifecycle:

  1. Initialization: In this phase react component prepares setting up the initial state and default props.
  2. Mounting: The react component is ready to mount in the browser DOM. This phase covers componentWillMount and componentDidMount lifecycle methods.
  3. Updating: In this phase, the component get updated in two ways, sending the new props and updating the state. This phase covers shouldComponentUpdate, componentWillUpdate and componentDidUpdate lifecycle methods.
  4. Unmounting: In this last phase, the component is not needed and get unmounted from the browser DOM. This phase include componentWillUnmount lifecycle method.

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q15: What are the lifecycle methods of ReactJS?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

  • componentWillMount: Executed before rendering and is used for App level configuration in your root component.
  • componentDidMount: Executed after first rendering and here all AJAX requests, DOM or state updates, and set up eventListeners should occur.
  • componentWillReceiveProps: Executed when particular prop updates to trigger state transitions.
  • shouldComponentUpdate: Determines if the component will be updated or not. By default it returns true. If you are sure that the component doesn't need to render after state or props are updated, you can return false value. It is a great place to improve performance as it allows you to prevent a rerender if component receives new prop.
  • componentWillUpdate: Executed before re-rendering the component when there are pros & state changes confirmed by shouldComponentUpdate which returns true.
  • componentDidUpdate: Mostly it is used to update the DOM in response to prop or state changes.
  • componentWillUnmount: It will be used to cancel any outgoing network requests, or remove all event listeners associated with the component.

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q16: What do these three dots (...) in React do?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

What does the ... do in this React (using JSX) code and what is it called?

<Modal {...this.props} title='Modal heading' animation={fal

That's property spread notation. It was added in ES2018 (spread for arrays/iterables was earlier, ES2015).

For instance, if this.props contained a: 1 and b: 2, then

<Modal {...this.props} title='Modal heading' animation={false}>

would be the same as:

<Modal a={this.props.a} b={this.props.b} title='Modal heading' animation={false}>

Spread notation is handy not only for that use case, but for creating a new object with most (or all) of the properties of an existing object — which comes up a lot when you're updating state, since you can't modify state directly:

this.setState(prevState => {
    return {foo: {...prevState.foo, a: "updated"}};
});

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q17: What are advantages of using React Hooks?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

Primarily, hooks in general enable the extraction and reuse of stateful logic that is common across multiple components without the burden of higher order components or render props. Hooks allow to easily manipulate the state of our functional component without needing to convert them into class components.

Hooks don’t work inside classes (because they let you use React without classes). By using them, we can totally avoid using lifecycle methods, such as componentDidMount, componentDidUpdate, componentWillUnmount. Instead, we will use built-in hooks like useEffect .

🔗 Source: hackernoon.com

Q18: What are React Hooks?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

Hooks are a new addition in React 16.8. They let you use state and other React features without writing a class. With Hooks, you can extract stateful logic from a component so it can be tested independently and reused. Hooks allow you to reuse stateful logic without changing your component hierarchy. This makes it easy to share Hooks among many components or with the community.

🔗 Source: reactjs.org

Q19: What is useState() in React?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

Explain what is the use of useState(0) there:

...
const [count, setCounter] = useState(0);
const [moreStuff, setMoreStuff] = useState(...);
...

const setCount = () => {
    setCounter(count + 1);
    setMoreStuff(...);
    ...
};

useState is one of build-in react hooks. useState(0) returns a tuple where the first parameter count is the current state of the counter and setCounter is the method that will allow us to update the counter's state.

We can use the setCounter method to update the state of count anywhere - In this case we are using it inside of the setCount function where we can do more things; the idea with hooks is that we are able to keep our code more functional and avoid class based components if not desired/needed.

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q20: What is StrictMode in React?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

React's StrictMode is sort of a helper component that will help you write better react components, you can wrap a set of components with <StrictMode /> and it'll basically:

  • Verify that the components inside are following some of the recommended practices and warn you if not in the console.
  • Verify the deprecated methods are not being used, and if they're used strict mode will warn you in the console.
  • Help you prevent some side effects by identifying potential risks.

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q21: Why do class methods need to be bound to a class instance?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

In JavaScript, the value of this changes depending on the current context. Within React class component methods, developers normally expect this to refer to the current instance of a component, so it is necessary to bind these methods to the instance. Normally this is done in the constructor—for example:

class SubmitButton extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      isFormSubmitted: false
    };
    this.handleSubmit = this.handleSubmit.bind(this);
  }

  handleSubmit() {
    this.setState({
      isFormSubmitted: true
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <button onClick={this.handleSubmit}>Submit</button>
    )
  }
}

🔗 Source: toptal.com

Q22: What is prop drilling and how can you avoid it?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐

When building a React application, there is often the need for a deeply nested component to use data provided by another component that is much higher in the hierarchy. The simplest approach is to simply pass a prop from each component to the next in the hierarchy from the source component to the deeply nested component. This is called prop drilling.

The primary disadvantage of prop drilling is that components that should not otherwise be aware of the data become unnecessarily complicated and are harder to maintain.

To avoid prop drilling, a common approach is to use React context. This allows a Provider component that supplies data to be defined, and allows nested components to consume context data via either a Consumer component or a useContext hook.

🔗 Source: toptal.com

Q23: Describe Flux vs MVC?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Traditional MVC patterns have worked well for separating the concerns of data (Model), UI (View) and logic (Controller) — but MVC architectures frequently encounter two main problems:

  • Poorly defined data flow: The cascading updates which occur across views often lead to a tangled web of events which is difficult to debug.

  • Lack of data integrity: Model data can be mutated from anywhere, yielding unpredictable results across the UI.

With the Flux pattern complex UIs no longer suffer from cascading updates; any given React component will be able to reconstruct its state based on the data provided by the store. The Flux pattern also enforces data integrity by restricting direct access to the shared data.

🔗 Source: codementor.io

Q24: What is the difference between a controlled component and an uncontrolled component?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

  • A controlled component is a component where React is in control and is the single source of truth for the form data.
  • An uncontrolled component is where your form data is handled by the DOM, instead of inside your React component.

Though uncontrolled components are typically easier to implement since you just grab the value from the DOM using refs, it’s typically recommended that you favor controlled components over uncontrolled components. The main reasons for this are that controlled components support instant field validation, allow you to conditionally disable/enable buttons, enforce input formats, and are more “the React way”.

🔗 Source: github.com/Pau1fitz

Q25: What is wrong with this code?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Questions:

What is wrong with this code?

this.setState((prevState, props) => {
  return {
    streak: prevState.streak + props.count
  }
})

Answer:

Nothing is wrong with it. It’s rarely used and not well known, but you can also pass a function to setState that receives the previous state and props and returns a new state, just as we’re doing above. And not only is nothing wrong with it, but it’s also actively recommended if you’re setting state based on previous state.

🔗 Source: tylermcginnis.com

Q26: What is the React context?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

It's an experimental API that allows you to pass data down through a tree of components without having to use props.

🔗 Source: github.com/WebPredict

Q27: What is React Fiber?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Fiber is the new reconciliation engine or reimplementation core algorithm in React 16. Its main goal is to enable incremental rendering of the virtual DOM.The goal of React Fiber is to increase its suitability for areas like animation, layout, gestures, ability to pause, abort, or reuse work and assign priority to different types of updates; and new concurrency primitives.

The goal of React Fiber is to increase its suitability for areas like animation, layout, and gestures. Its headline feature is incremental rendering: the ability to split rendering work into chunks and spread it out over multiple frames.

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q28: How to apply validation on Props in ReactJS?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

When the application is running in development mode, React will automatically check for all props that we set on components to make sure they must right correct and right data type. For incorrect type, it will generate warning messages in the console for development mode whereas it is disabled in production mode due performance impact. The mandatory prop is defined with isRequired.

The set of predefined prop types are below

  1. React.PropTypes.string
  2. React.PropTypes.number
  3. React.PropTypes.func
  4. React.PropTypes.node
  5. React.PropTypes.bool

For example, we define propTypes for user component as below,

import PropTypes from 'prop-types';

class User extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <h1>Welcome, {this.props.name}</h1>
      <h2>Age, {this.props.age}
    );
  }
}

User.propTypes = {
  name: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
  age: PropTypes.number.isRequired

};

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q29: What is the difference between ReactJS and Angular?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

ReactJS Angular
React is a Library and has only the View layer Angular is a Framework and has complete MVC functionality
React handle rendering on the server side Angular JS render on the client side but Angular 2 and above render on the server side
In React, HTML is written in JS which can be confusing Angular follows the template approach for HTML, which makes code shorter and easy to understand.
React native, which is a React type to build mobile applications are faster and more stable Ionic, Angular’s mobile native app is relatively less stable and slower
In React, data flows only in one way and hence debugging is easy In Angular, data flows both way i.e it has two-way data binding between children and parent and hence debugging is often difficult

🔗 Source: github.com/sudheerj

Q30: What is the difference between using constructor vs getInitialState in React?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

The difference between constructor and getInitialState is the difference between ES6 and ES5 itself. You should initialize state in the constructor when using ES6 classes, and define the getInitialState method when using React.createClass.

    class MyComponent extends React.Component {
      constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = { /* initial state */ };
      }
    }

is equivalent to

    var MyComponent = React.createClass({
      getInitialState() {
        return { /* initial state */ };
      },
    });

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q31: When is it important to pass props to super(), and why?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

The only one reason when one needs to pass props to super() is when you want to access this.props in constructor:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {    
    constructor(props) {
        super(props)

        console.log(this.props)
        // -> { icon: 'home', … }
    }
}

Not passing:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {    
    constructor(props) {
        super()

        console.log(this.props)
        // -> undefined

        // Props parameter is still available
        console.log(props)
        // -> { icon: 'home', … }
    }

    render() {
        // No difference outside constructor
        console.log(this.props)
        // -> { icon: 'home', … }
    }
}

Note that passing or not passing props to super has no effect on later uses of this.props outside constructor.

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q32: How to conditionally add attributes to React components?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Is there a way to only add attributes to a React component if a certain condition is met?


For certain attributes, React is intelligent enough to omit the attribute if the value you pass to it is not truthy. For example:

var InputComponent = React.createClass({
    render: function() {
        var required = true;
        var disabled = false;

        return (
            <input type="text" disabled={disabled} required={required} />
        );
    }
});

will result in:

<input type="text" required>

Another possible approach is:

var condition = true;

var component = (
  <div
    value="foo"
    { ...( condition && { disabled: true } ) } />
);

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q33: Do Hooks replace render props and higher-order components?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Often, render props and higher-order components render only a single child. React team thinks Hooks are a simpler way to serve this use case.

There is still a place for both patterns (for example, a virtual scroller component might have a renderItem prop, or a visual container component might have its own DOM structure). But in most cases, Hooks will be sufficient and can help reduce nesting in your tree.

🔗 Source: reactjs.org

Q34: How would you go about investigating slow React application rendering?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

One of the most common issues in React applications is when components re-render unnecessarily. There are two tools provided by React that are helpful in these situations:

  • React.memo(): This prevents unnecessary re-rendering of function components
  • PureComponent: This prevents unnecessary re-rendering of class components

Both of these tools rely on a shallow comparison of the props passed into the component—if the props have not changed, then the component will not re-render. While both tools are very useful, the shallow comparison brings with it an additional performance penalty, so both can have a negative performance impact if used incorrectly. By using the React Profiler, performance can be measured before and after using these tools to ensure that performance is actually improved by making a given change.

🔗 Source: toptal.com

Q35: When would you use StrictMode component in React?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

I've found it especially useful to implement strict mode when I'm working on new code bases and I want to see what kind of code/components I'm facing. Also if you're on bug hunting mode, sometimes it's a good idea to wrap with the components/blocks of code you think might be the source of the problem.

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q36: What is a pure function?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

A Pure function is a function that doesn't depend on and doesn't modify the states of variables out of its scope. Essentially, this means that a pure function will always return the same result given same parameters.

🔗 Source: github.com/Pau1fitz

Q37: How does React renderer work exactly when we call setState?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

There are two steps of what we may call "render":

  1. Virtual DOM render: when render method is called it returns a new virtual dom structure of the component. This render method is called always when you call setState(), because shouldComponentUpdate always returns true by default. So, by default, there is no optimization here in React.

  2. Native DOM render: React changes real DOM nodes in your browser only if they were changed in the Virtual DOM and as little as needed - this is that great React's feature which optimizes real DOM mutation and makes React fast.

🔗 Source: stackoverflow.com

Q38: What is the key architectural difference between a JavaScript library such as React and a JavaScript framework such as Angular?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

React enables developers to render a user interface. To create a full front-end application, developers need other pieces, such as state management tools like Redux.

Like React, Angular enables developers to render a user interface, but it is a “batteries included” framework that includes prescriptive, opinionated solutions to common requirements like state management.

While there are many other considerations when comparing React and Angular specifically, this key architectural difference means that:

  • Using a library such as React can give a project a greater ability to evolve parts of the system—again for example, state management—over time, when new solutions are created by the open source community.
  • Using a framework such as Angular can make it easier for developers to get started and can also simplify maintenance.

🔗 Source: toptal.com

Q39: How to avoid the need for binding in React?

Topic: React
Difficulty: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

There are several common approaches used to avoid methods binding in React:

  1. Define Your Event Handler as an Inline Arrow Function
class SubmitButton extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      isFormSubmitted: false
    };
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <button onClick={() => {
        this.setState({ isFormSubmitted: true });
      }}>Submit</button>
    )
  }
}
  1. Define Your Event Handler as an Arrow Function Assigned to a Class Field
class SubmitButton extends React.Component {
  state = {
    isFormSubmitted: false
  }

  handleSubmit = () => {
    this.setState({
      isFormSubmitted: true
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <button onClick={this.handleSubmit}>Submit</button>
    )
  }
}
  1. Use a Function Component with Hooks
const SubmitButton = () => {
  const [isFormSubmitted, setIsFormSubmitted] = useState(false);

  return (
    <button onClick={() => {
        setIsFormSubmitted(true);
    }}>Submit</button>
  )
};

🔗 Source: toptal.com

Thanks 🙌 for reading and good luck on your interview!
Please share this article with your fellow devs if you like it!
Check more FullStack Interview Questions & Answers on 👉 www.fullstack.cafe

Discussion

pic
Editor guide
Collapse
pixelgoo profile image
Anton Melnyk

Q2 answer is outdated.

After introducing hooks API the real difference between class and functional components is that functional ones capture their values.

Details

Collapse
jsco profile image
Jesco Wuester

A lot of these are outdated or highly misleading.

Collapse
potouridisio profile image
Ioannis Potouridis

I'd prefer a guy that doesn't know what React Fiber is but knows:

  1. When to use local state

  2. How many times did his component render and why

  3. How to optimize 2.

Collapse
antonydb profile image
Antony Del Beato

Q12 Adding click events to divs is bad, use a button instead for a11y.

Collapse
joydeeep profile image
Joydeeep

Was on the lookout for some React Resources and landed up here;)
Thanks for the effort man..!

Sharing one of my favorite site for react interview questions:
interviewbit.com/react-interview-q...

Also another repos with amazing resources: github.com/MaximAbramchuck/awesome...

Collapse
wolverineks profile image
Kevin Sullivan

Can you identify 2 problems?

Yes. You're not using eslint, or prettier, or typescript or flow...

Collapse
leonardoalves profile image
leonardo-alves

stateless component != functional component