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re: Are You a Mediocre Developer? ME TOO VIEW POST

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re: I tend to waffle between I-don't-want-to-seem-like-I-have-a-big-ego and this-was-a-week-of-my-life-now-pay-me attitudes on this. However in this ...

I wrote our hiring tech test. We spec it at a day, but for a junior position (dependent on resume) we'll either extend to 3 days or just skip the test all together.

When I get the answers, I don't even bother to read the code. Does it compile? Does it have better than nonexistent tests? Cool.

I do look for the commit history (the reason for the requirement of uploading to a public git repo to share it with us...). I'm looking at two things; commit messages & thought pattern approaching the problem.

If an applicant tried to bill me us for the day's effort, I'd have a good laugh & legal would write a stern letter back.

While we spec it at a day, a decent senior can fulfill it in an hour and change. If you're applying for a senior position & it took you 3 days, you might be lucky to get a low ball offer.

While I don't condone billing your interview at all, OP's experience still seems over-the-top for an interview, does it not? I can understand being frustrated with aspects of the feedback that could have easily been resolved in the first code reviews of full employment.

Don't get me wrong, I agree, OP went well above & beyond.

Even so, billing for that would get a response from legal, rather than HR (or me).

The lesson here, is that OP should have stopped sooner. Particularly on the first reply from them that suggested improvements.

I've had 1 person that I've given feedback to (because the project didn't compile!) - they were subsequently hired (against my advice). I had to fire them a week later.

If there is need for ANY feedback loop in the interview process that isn't face-to-face, it's time for both parties to walk away.

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