re: Rituals of Shaming in the Software Industry VIEW POST

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Interesting read, but I don't share the opinion. Being assertive is a very hard skill to attain, most junior devs don't get proper feedback and are left to fail alone. Feedback early is important. I would rather have a broken CI build or a bad code review than a bug in production.

If this industry needs something is more feedback before shipping.

I agree that bro culture don't help but I never heard of stuff like wearing a hat for breaking a build. That's what git branches are for, to experiment and break the build before it affects others. And code reviews are still not that common in the industry.

Not doing ttd won't make you a bad developer, no one ever said that, but it is funny that you quoted Uncle Bob, who defined a very good list of code smells. Whats more shameful than saying that your code smell? He's also a big advocate of TDD btw.

 

@cthothubo , you are quite right with your observations that practices that uncover bugs / inadequate code before it reaches the end user are essential. Short feedback-loops are important. The angle here is that there are good and bad ways to give that feedback. If you follow the link to "candid feedback", you'll understand what I mean.

You are also right that it is a very hard skill to attain, something that Andrea Goulet speaks about when she says that "Communication is just as important as code": codingwithempathy.com/2016/07/19/v...

In regards to breaking the build, I've haven't personally experienced the hat, but have heard of that and similar techniques. Quick google uncovered this: mindfulhacker.com/who-broke-the-bu... .

Code smells are shaming of code. Not people. There's a difference. Be harsh with code, but be kind to the coder.

Be well
-Pavneet

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