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Discussion on: Why Older People Struggle In Programming Jobs

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers

Wow adam really nice article, not sure if I'm old, but seeing the people I always work with I feel old.. (being in tech for 15 years now)

It does really resonate with me what you write about the pushy mentality of literally anyone and everyone...
Making sure they're problem (often a stupid promise) is going to be your problem. Here we go again, Bill made a stupid promise to a client, and has Adam convinced it will really make the client happy if we can just wing this little tiny fix in this sprint.

Now you can't manage this or other works doesn't get done, doesn't matter, it's always your fault...

Really frustrating indeed.

Another one, which I wanted to resonate with you is this one:
In the last 2 jobs, I got hired as a Senior Developer, much like you because I like to develop, and not particularly manage a big team...

I'm still ok, being a scrum leader and guide the new kids to success.

BUT, what really bugs me, is silent expectations..
Oh man, I had another chat with the CEO and Project manager the other day, because they "expected" a senior dev to find flaws in a design? or they expected me to create a full training session for the new kid?

Like I'm all ok if you tell me to do these things, but how must one know you expected these things?

Is this also something you encountered, the silent expectations due to your seniority?

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bytebodger profile image
Adam Nathaniel Davis Author

Great questions. And some of these are probably best encapsulated in another article. But the short answer is, yes, I've definitely experienced this. There's a whole bunch of confusion out there around what is meant by senior developer, tech lead, architect, and/or dev manager. While it's nice, on many levels, to be "senior", you can also find yourself in these horrible, poorly-defined, unwritten, hybrid roles where management still wants to see you as (and treat you as) a "coder" - but they also want to lean on you to do many of the things one would normally expect from management.

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sirseanofloxley profile image
Sean Allin Newell

Ah yes, the senior engineer/principal/architect/wizard-ruler-rocker role.

I am recently coming off a lead position (over 3 devs) where i had two more senior than I devs under me and the other a bright college grad. I often scratched my head at why senior engineer X didn't do Y, and every time I asked myself, well, did I ask them to do that?

The clearer expectations are, the clearer everything is! I'm still gonna be working on thwt on my new role for sure; both upwards, downwards, and horizontally.

I'm also about to enter my thirties, so tryin' to chill out. Got a baby now!

amy poehler pregnant bouncing

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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers

Yeah 100% not worth getting stressed out about, and I think as with many things communication is key, if you are a senior but none of your previous companies workers with Git (stupid example but it happens) are you then expected to use CI etc without ever being told.
Same for testing, Till this day it has never been a mark in any of the companies I work for, and I still feel comfortable being a senior without it.

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bytebodger profile image
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dailydevtips1 profile image
Chris Bongers

Awesome! Yeah resonates well, thanks for this write-up, I might also try an article towards this seniority expectations haha.