loading...
Cover image for WTF is wrong with recruiters?

WTF is wrong with recruiters?

dvddpl profile image Davide de Paolis ・3 min read

Do you believe in ghosts? - Today is National Paranormal Day! ...wtf does that even mean?!?

Hi! I believe you are one of the top 5 developers in your city! Yeah, sure..

New Year, new challenges. sent beginning of January, how original...

The Best IT Pioneers are Looking for You!

Hi! You just won a lottery ticket worth $$$ per year :facepalm

These are just a bunch of Email subjects I received in the past months from Recruiters and Head Hunters. I was pretty sure I could find more but apparently the stupidest or most boring ones went straight to the bin.

What happened to the Recruiters/HeadHunters in the past 3 to 4 years?

In the past, I was also receiving quite a big deal of offers or contact requests from recruiters but I remember them as more professional and discrete: either they were asking honestly if I was interested in their "help" in searching new opportunities, or they were directly suggesting a specific position.

I understand that the market of recruiters ( and developers ) is now very crowded and competitive, but seriously,

trying to catch my attention with such cheesy/cheap clickbait subjets is very sad.

Even though I am not actively looking for a new job, it would be stupid to not be aware of what the market is looking for or offering, so sometimes I reply and ask for more info about the position they are offering - and for which I would be - their own words - a perfect match!

That's when the recruiters start to become vague about the position they mentioned and say that before they can disclose information about company salary and whatsoever they'd like to have an introductory chat to really understand if my profile really matches ( wasn't that the reason why you contacted me in the first place?).

If you make the mistake to arrange this quick chat
(as I did more than once... I am too nice and every now and then I give a new recruiter a chance - and fall in the trap) you will be kept for about 45 minutes on the phone to answer lots of questions about your experience and skills that clearly show they haven't read your profile at all - and that they have no idea what they are talking about:

I am a Node - React full-stack dev, why are you asking me if I use Maven and SpringBoot in my daily tasks!?!.

Java vs Javascript

The truth likely is, they have no position ready for you. They just want to fill up their Database of contacts to pick from for whenever they will have something.
I find this very unprofessional and disappointing.

As much as I hate when they make cold calls. If they managed to find out your phone number or have it from that quick chat happened months before, they just call you without notice to discuss your current status or ask what you think about a job offer.
Can't you realize that I am very likely at work, in my office at my current company, actually doing my job, and that could be a bit uncomfortable having such a conversation there? Just send me a quick email or message and arrange a suitable time.

Seriously recruiters, do not waste people's time, do not spam people's email with cheesy templated messages ( once I received the same email for the same position from two recruiters of the same agency - with the exact same message) and don't ask me to present myself so that I look a good catch for you to show off at the hiring company.

I have LinkedIn, I have Xing, I have a blog, everything I can say about myself to catch your ( or the company's ) attention is there, and YOU contacted me, so YOU should make the company and position appealing for me, not the other way around.

Do not waste my time. Be professional, and precise. Tell me immediately what is the job about and the name of the company.
And don't ask me for my current salary - everyone knows how knowing the salary affects the salary negotiation during the interview - so I will not let you know.


Photo by Free To Use Sounds on Unsplash

Discussion

pic
Editor guide
Collapse
megangawlinski profile image
megangawlinski

I already got a few messages in which I was contacted with "Dear Mr. ..."
Even though my last name may be confusing, none of them looked at my profile. My profile picture alone should make it clear that I am not a man.

Collapse
greenroommate profile image
Haris Secic

What about not judging by looks gender this and that rights. I would start with dear whateveryoucallyourself just to be sure. Joking aside mr and mrs could be replaced by developer/engineer and such 😁

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

oh... that's is so bad.. have you ever spent a few seconds to point it out to them?

Collapse
megangawlinski profile image
megangawlinski

Some of them I actually answered. One answer was that the message was definitely designed to fit my profile, and that there was only a mistake with my name… I don’t know if I should believe that :D

Normally I think that I don’t want to invest more time into it, they lost me by making that mistaken anyway.

Thread Thread
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

exactly. I also try to not waste more of my time on that. but sometimes the temptation of pointing out their unprofessionality is stronger :-)

Thread Thread
davidsonsousa profile image
Davidson Sousa

You can believe if the recruiter is Polish as they have different versions for male and female surnames. For them your surname is "male" while the "female" version is be Gawlinska.

Thread Thread
megangawlinski profile image
megangawlinski

I'm aware of that - but you could still prevent it if you take a closer look at the profile. :)

Thread Thread
davidsonsousa profile image
Davidson Sousa

Definitely. But your case is "local". Imagine a guy named Ashley or Lindsay 😁

Collapse
kiro_kleine profile image
Victoria

I am a recruiter, can I share my 5 cents?

Your article's comments are valid, and gladly posts like this help me to do my job better. Thank you.

One positive thing to remember is this. If recruiters reach out to you, your skill is in demand. Majority of workers are not developers, their skill in not in such demand. Emails from recruiters are your market barometer. Take it to your advantage!

I recently switched from agency recruiting (basically new call centers) into internal recruitment. The quality of my work went up. Still, technical recruiters are not developers. Although I know that React is a library but Angular is a framework, there is still so much I can understand while recruiting for 30-40 non-overlapping jobs simultaneously.

Collapse
themoviemadman profile image
Eliseo D'Annunzio

“...One positive thing to remember is this. If recruiters reach out to you, your skill is in demand...”

That is if the main skill of the role is within the candidate’s scope of skills. I have counted more times than not where a recruiter has approached me asking about my interest in a role which is completely wrong for me. They search for “developer” and believe that you’re perfect for a role that requires Springboard, Java and Magento... while you have no experience in either of these...

At least two-thirds of recruiters I’ve come across over the last two years have no understanding of the industry they’re recruiting in... how can any candidate have confidence in the ability of a recruiter to help them score a role if they can’t even understand what a client wants or what a candidate has to offer?

Collapse
kiro_kleine profile image
Victoria

Your commentary is extremely valid, and indeed it is difficult for each recruiter to nail it right. Data Analyst vs. Data Scientist? QA Developer - Python or Java? Sysadmin vs. IT support? I was in those shoes as well, I did my mistakes.

Nobody is perfect. You too have most likely taken a few iterations before you wrote the perfect code, and bless the testers to have corrected what you have overlooked or could not see. It is true for other industries and professions as well.

The real question is - are you going to wait for the perfect recruiter to reach out to you? Or are you going to educate a recruiter and nurture and ongoing relationship with them? Both are valid and are up to you.

Thread Thread
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

thanks for your comment.
but no, sorry I am not going to educate a recruiter to do his job properly. Testers are part of the same company and they can point out my mistakes, but don't / can't / are not able to tell me how to do my job ( and if the bug makes it to the end-user, believe me the end user can get pretty pissed too), so you example doesn't fit.
And honestly, for what they are paid ( out of MY salary, out of the number I eventually negotiated) I expect them to be more professional.

Thread Thread
kiro_kleine profile image
Victoria

Ok to be honest if you negotiate a salary and have to share - that's a steal! I work as an in-house recruiter, so cannot say anything about salary sharing.

Agency recruiters seem to be a temporary patch, really. There is a much bigger problem behind it... A whole different flaw in the system.

Thread Thread
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

most of this post is referring to external recruiters, recruiters agencies.
it's not a share that we devs have to give them. it's the fee the company that will hire me has to pay them. and it's a percentage of the salary I will get during the first year of employment.
and afaik it is normally around 20/25% which is huge - for doing basically nothing besides spamming a bunch of devs you found on the internet and making a couple of phone calls to arrange an interview.

It is a much different and bigger problem behind these recruiters.

exactly, and this is what I was addressing.

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

that´s for sure. and that´ the annoying part. but more generally it means at least that our job is still in demand. it might not be your specific skill (react or java) but you could always, in need switch tech stack, and learn what the market asks. It´s not so easy in other fields. :-)

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

sure you can! glad to hear recruiters opinions.

of course i always keep in mind that if I get emails from recruiters it means that somehow my job is still in demand. but for the reason I mentioned it has become less meaningfull.

In the past I felt gratitude for each email I was receiving. I felt obliged to reply. Ehi, I am lucky. I work in a market where there is a lot of demand, and among many devs they contacted me!

Do you understand that after 100 emails where you clearly understand they did not even read your profile, this loses value?

Recruiting is kinda like dating. You appreciate compliments, when are sincere, if you realize that the person you are dating is saying the same compliment to every single breathing being they meet, well, isn-t that a bit insulting?

btw. of course I am talking mostly about recruiting agencies, not recruiters or HR people working for the same company that is hiring.
:-)

Collapse
kiro_kleine profile image
Victoria

Yes, I agree. The article like yours showcases a symptom of a bigger problem, which is recruitment agencies business model. Sigh.

I found a little trick on LinkedIn which you may find helpful. The more you reply to InMails, the higher in the search list you will appear for other recruiters searching for your skill.

Another tip. If you are dedicated, keep your LinkedIn connections as clean and genuine as possible. Agency recruiters find you through your 2nd or 3rd degree connections. Find the infected link and remove it.

Finally, make your profile as minimalist as possible. Remove searchable skills and buzzwords. Industry players would see your employer name and know which ecosystem of tools you work with.

Although, something tells me you do all these already... :D

Collapse
elitegroupasia profile image
Elite Group Asia

"....while recruiting for 30-40 non-overlapping jobs simultaneously."

Thats a crazy load of jobs to effectively search deeply for each role!

Collapse
kiro_kleine profile image
Victoria

True, the reality of bulk recruitement. Each candidate who isn't a fit is a lesson for me to improve my search.

Collapse
schwiz profile image
Nathan Schwermann

My very favorite interaction with a recruiter was when they contacted me asking me if I was interested in the exact position I already held at the company I already worked for. We were hiring a peer whom I would be interviewing myself. "Yes, yes I would be interested in keeping my job, thanks for asking."

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

ah ah ah! something similar happened to a collegue of mine. He quit and we were looking for someone to replace him. Some dumb external recruiter contacted him offering the position he left the week before... :facepalm ...

Collapse
missamarakay profile image
Amara Graham

It's bots and template emails. I have to constantly remind myself recruiters may be casting the biggest, broadest net as fast as they can.

What's sad though is poor experiences with recruiters become a reflection on the company. So whether you are looking or not, that can impact your decision to apply to that company in the future.

Collapse
emildafinov profile image
Emil Dafinov

I have been contacted:

  • With emails starting with "Dear sir/madam,"
  • By 5 different recruiters from the same recruiting company, for the same position, and each subsequent one would only pop up after I'd refuse the previous one.
  • By getting the exact same offer in a different language, right after refusing it initially.
  • With the standard "You seem like a great fit" intro, for a senior PHP dev position, when I have no PHP experience listed anywhere on my profile.

I've also had a recruiter micro-manage me through interview preparation ("DO prepare, DO wear a nice shirt on the call, DO NOT talk about salary, or deviate from the number we gave them"), while he obviously couldn't be bothered to run a spell checker on his email.

So yeah...Not that I mind the attention, but it is tad unprofessional at times.

Collapse
emildafinov profile image
Emil Dafinov

Fun update: today while looking at the list of people who viewed my profile on LinkedIn, I found this gem of a recruiter: his profile pic is him, waist up, shirtless, ripped and flexing :D

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

oh.. those tips are really ridicoulos, do they think they are dealing with kindergarden kids or IT professionals?

btw.. don't deviate from the number they game them!? unbelievable..

Collapse
colinrhys profile image
Colin Rhys

Was it Robert Half? Either way, I have had the same issue with a number of different firms. Very annoying I feel your pain.

Collapse
lukeamicuselit profile image
luke-amicuselit

This is the sad truth. For the last 6 years, I've been recruiting engineers. It's been a life-changing experience but I don't so much enjoy the job anymore and for many of the reasons you call out. To be the smartest person in a room full of recruiters is the equivalent of being the "most pragmatic" person at a flat earther meet up. The bottom line, things have changed in recent years as you allude to, and now apparently anyone can recruit engineering professionals. Just throw a bib on them and it'll manage the drivel. It's literally a disgrace. I've always had a strong distaste for recruiters..despite being one. My philosophy has been and remains: if you're going to meddle in people's careers, do it well.

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

glad to hear the voice of one recruiter. sad to hear that of course, you are aware of the damage most of your unprofessional colleagues are doing to the market.. :-(
thanx for your comment

Collapse
lukeamicuselit profile image
luke-amicuselit

Yep. I found your post in SourceCons FB group. Someone obviously felt compelled to share. There's 10k members in the group. Maybe some get the message and change for the better, but that's optismistic. IMO the best way to precipitate change on the part of developers, is to call out utter nonsense when you encounter it. Tactics that emit shame and embarrassment, while not admirable, could be used as tools for good.

Thread Thread
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

oh.. should I expect a shitstorm now? ヽ(゚Д゚)ノ
I guess my name and profile are now blacklisted on every recruiters database... and I don't know how to feel about it? is it a bad thing or good thing? ;-Þ

Thread Thread
lukeamicuselit profile image
luke-amicuselit

LOL hey now.. don't shoot the messenger.

Collapse
dinsmoredesign profile image
Derek D

Recruiters have really left a bad taste in my mouth lately. I still entertain them every once and a while if they have something that might be particularly intriguing, but they have really become increasingly unprofessional.

Story #1: About a year and a half ago, I was contacted by a recruiter for a position at a larger startup locally of whom he was representing. After some phone interviews and a technical interview, I really liked the product I'd be working on and the team. I received an offer and accepted.

My boss was on vacation that week, so I asked to start in 3 weeks, so I could give a proper notice. I spoke with my boss toward the end of the week and she asked if I'd be open to a counter-offer. I took the weekend to think over my options and it was that weekend that my wife and I found out she was pregnant with our second child. Monday, my boss came back with a counter offer that was not only stronger, but it gave me a promotion to a higher position with the promise of building out a team of developers under me.

Now, somewhat freaking out over the news of a child and the uncertainty of my employment, we both felt much more comfortable with me staying where I was, especially since I'd be getting a pretty large raise, so I declined the other offer. What happened over the next few days is the craziest amount of unprofessionalism I've ever experienced.

The recruiter called me at least 50 times over and over throughout the course of 2-3 days. There were ~15 emails and countless texts of him telling me I was making the wrong decision and he could get me even more money (he told me before the offer they gave me was as high as they'd go when I tried to negotiate, but then started promising me $20-30k more 🙄 - keep in mind, he doesn't work for this company). The company itself actually, very nicely, offered to pay Cobra insurance for me to accommodate the gap in coverage I'd have with their 90 day policy, but in the end, there was no way I was accepting just because of the crazy recruiter.

Story #2: I've chatted with a recruiter before and even gone out to lunch with her and really liked her and loved her approach... She contacts me for a job out of the blue and asks if I'd be interested and I tell her yes, giving her the usual update on my skills, blah blah blah. We talk about the position and I'm getting pretty excited, then she asks me to do a React assessment because I've never held a position working with it at a job.

At first, I thought her question was reasonable, but I have 5+ years of experience and hold a senior level-position. I have vast experience with Vue and have done significant work in Node and PHP and get my hands dirty in .NET if I have to. I use React on several side projects, and have used Angular 1 and it's newer variants on a few projects. If they're only interested in hiring someone who can answer useless React trivia in some outdated multiple-choice assessment, then I'm not your guy. For an entry-level person who has zero work experience at all, at an entry level position, sure, but I felt super insulted, especially coming from someone who I thought I'd cultivated a pretty good and understanding relationship with...

Story #3: I interviewed for and was offered a position at a company and offered a ~$25k raise. Up until this point, everything was great, the company was awesome (some of the smartest devs I've ever met), the recruiter was an ex developer who really knew his stuff, the company was a 5 minute drive from me and the technology they were working with was right up my alley. I distinctly remember the recruiter delivering the offer to me over the phone and saying, "I'm going to send you the offer and the benefits, definitely go over everything and make sure it works good for you and your family. At the end of the day, you have to do what's right for you." I thought this was super cool, FINALLY, a recruiter who actually cared about me.

Wrong. After looking over the benefits package, everything looked great, except the health benefits, which were twice as expensive as what I already had. The offer letter also contained a clause, which I went over with my attorney, that stated that they had sole rights to any work I did outside of the position, regardless of if it was done on company property or not (this is a no-go for me, as I freelance on the side). Moreover, they were unwilling to write a work-at-home day into my contract, which I had specifically told the recruiter was a deal breaker for me if they couldn't deliver on other fronts.

I declined the offer and the recruiter told me he was, "Sure they could make good on all my concerns, but it seemed like I made up my mind, so he wasn't going to wait for me." How they going to change the health benefits they offer everyone for one person...? 🤣

Moral of the Story: My current company is awesome and the grass is definitely not always greener on the other side.

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

thanx for sharing your "interesting" stories. :-)
I understand they can get pretty upset of seeing all their efforts ( and their share) vanish when you change your mind, but seeing them become annoying or rude is very sad and proof of their unprofessionalism.

I also feel kind of insulting, when in introductory chats or ( even some tech interviews ) after having discussed infrastructure design, cloud architecture, leadeadership and mentorship skills etc, you are handed over a silly coding task..

Collapse
ferricoxide profile image
Thomas H Jones II

3-4 years? Longer than that, I'm afraid. Basically, since the proliferation of turn-key recruitment tools (like Taleo), things have been straight-garbage (and why so many messages include "I found your info in our database").

What's really great is the proliferation of recruiting mailing lists. You start noticing that some rando, low-grade recruiter (or, more frequently, recruiting-firm) keeps sending you recruitment emails. Many, the subjects are so awful that you never actually click on the email to see that there's an "unsubscribe" link somewhere in the email ...or if you do open the email and notice such a link, you find yourself internally-raging, "why the hell should I have to opt out of this shit you're slinging??"

Collapse
davidsonsousa profile image
Davidson Sousa

There are few I know who actually keep a good set of information about me and use that to make me feel as the most important person in the universe. It's a good feeling, I can't deny. They ask how I am, how it was on company X and why I moved to Y. Then talking about how working for Z would suits me because they have what I like (and tell me what I told them months or years ago). Some of them even gave me advice on how to write a good CV by pointing mistakes I had eventually made. They all started in the cold, but were able to build this relationship with me from day one by just treating me as a human being.
But the rule is, unfortunately, what you wrote. Most of them don't have any clue of - guess what - how to treat people like people. They learn about maximize results so... We get what we get.
There is a long way to go. All we can do for now is to refuse to talk to such people.

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

yes, that's why I said in the past years it was not so bad. there were a few, keeping in touch regularly, normally twice a year for a quick update. it was very human and definetely worth the time spent.
now they became like used-cars dealers. fake politeness and fake interest in you just, as you said, trying to maximize their results.
they might be spamming 100 people a day - which are left with a bad taste in their mouth about every recruiter out there - but they end up with at least a couple of preys :-)

Collapse
davidsonsousa profile image
Davidson Sousa

"used-cars dealers" - hahahaha I never thought about that, but I'm gonna use it from now on! 😁

Collapse
patabah profile image
PatAbah

Maybe you guys don't know, but there's something like pay per call. Someone explained it to me... It didn't make sense ... And it still doesn't.

So this is how it works: You sign up, you make calls and you'll be paid for how long you spend per call.

Developers are a nice target because, if given the chance, we'll talk and talk about our skill.

Some of these people that annoying calls aren't recruiters per se. They don't even know what they're talking about. They just did little research so they could get the conversation going.

Trust me, it makes no sense... But they get paid.

Collapse
kendellrecruits profile image
Kendell Henle

Having worked for and with Multiple staffing agencies, and now in house, I promise you this isn’t typical at all. I’ve never heard of this and I’ve been in the business of Recruitment for quite some time in the Bay Area and New York City where there’s a lot of recruitment going on.

Collapse
kendellrecruits profile image
Kendell Henle

Hi there! A friend sent this article to me, and I created an account to ask you all question...

For context:
I manage and run recruitment for a tech company called Jumpshot. We are constantly hiring as our company grows. Most of our new headcount is due to newly created roles (because of our company’s growth), or because we’ve promoted existing employees. It’s my job to make sure these open roles are hired for.

I also get hit up by recruiters all the time. And I agree, a lot of the emails and LinkedIn messages I get from recruiters are crap. That said, as a recruiter, I understand the struggle is very real to find qualified talent for multiple open headcount, particularly for a multi location company such as ours.

My question to you all is this:
Beyond obvious error avoidance (such as sending you an email about the wrong type of job, misspelling your name, using the wrong gender pronouns, etc), what would you prefer recruiters do differently?

Additionally:
How can a small/mid-size tech company, like the one I work for, make sure we are on your radar when you are ready to look for a new job?

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

thanx for taking the time for writing this comment.
well. in general, at least for me, I´d like more transparency and speed: I don't want to spend time - be it 5 minutes or 45 minutes to tell every recruiter what I do, what is my skill set and what I am looking for ( actually I am not looking for anything at all - you contacted me because you think I fit to a specific position..) I have my LinkedIn and xing profile and they are updated. if something matches well, let's discuss it, and tell me immediately the name of the company.

More in general - sorry for being maybe too blunt - I don't see much value added by the current recruiting system. If the recruiters are just promoting jobs that are already available on multiple sources why to bother - If I am looking for a new position, it´s very likely I googled around and made some research.
Different story if the company itself prefers to go only with the recruiters' channel - then it could make sense, but again, in that case, I would be likely already in touch with just one or two recruiters that would contact me whenever something really matches - and could tickle my curiosity.

Collapse
kendellrecruits profile image
Kendell Henle

Hi Davide,

I understand what you are saying, however you’re talking about Recruiters who work for recruitment agencies. Whereas I’m talking about in-house recruiters such as myself Who are full-time salaried employees directly for the company for which they are recruiting.

In fact, almost everyone in this entire thread is talking solely about agency side recruiters not in-house recruiters. And there is a marked difference. Agency Recruiters are those who are independent or work for an agency where they represent multiple companies at a given time.

Most companies are building out their own internal recruiting departments.

Even still, the typical interview process for almost every company out there is:

  1. An initial phone call with a recruiter
  2. A hiring manager interview
  3. Onsite etc. etc.

The initial Recruiter phone call is to make sure it’s a good match for both parties.

There will be some recap of your work experience - that is typical because anyone can write anything they want on their LinkedIn. It’s important in the initial phone call to touch on the candidate experience and background to make sure it’s legit by asking a questions digging deeper into the candidates experience. The other part of the call is to thoroughly describe our company, what we do, the job for which were hiring, and the department the role sits within.

In addition, we will discuss your salary requirements, our budget for the role, and both of our timelines.

While, from what you said, this might not seem like a good use of time, it’s extraordinarily important to make sure we don’t mutually waste each others time. It wouldn’t make sense to go through the entire interview process just to find out we have a huge salary to budget discrepancy, or you’re not really ready to make a move yet, or you don’t actually have a technical experience required for the job. These things can all be covered in that initial phone call.

All of this said, agency recruiters have given all recruiters a bad name, but the process is still similar. I still look for profiles on LinkedIn, AngelList, Indeed, Github, etc. and I send out emails and messages to attract possible candidates in hopes they will respond. When they do, we set up that initial phone call, and if it goes well then we continue the interview process.

As a job seeker it’s in one’s best interest to adhere to this process with in-house recruiters, as it is what it is. (Even though having the same conversation multiple times can be a bit annoying, that’s just the process. So be it.)

Now, agency recruiters Will work with different companies. Recruiter A may work with companies 1, 2 and 3, and Recruiter B works with companies 4, 5 and 6. So it could be in your best interest to still work with multiple recruiters since they work with different clients. You could trick the system and get the company names from the recruiter on your initial call then immediately go and apply on your own before they submit you to the client. I can go in to a lot more information on all this, but I’ve already written a lot.

What you can do differently to make it better is: the next time you are looking for work, only work with internal recruiters and not agency recruiters. And since you are not actively looking, you are much better off only speaking with internal recruiters rather than agency recruiters.

All of this said, my question is still not answered. :-) That is:

  1. Beyond obvious error avoidance, what would you prefer recruiters do differently? (Update: this is with the understanding that the initial interview screen with the recruiter is a good thing for both parties and likely is unavoidable.)
  2. How can a small/mid-size tech company, like the one I work for, make sure we are on your radar when you are ready to look for a new job?
Thread Thread
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

thanx for the long reply.
the article is referring - and all the commenters were referring - to recruiting agency and external recruiters or head hunters or whatever we want to call them. I don´t think anyone meant HR people recruiting for their company.
Honestly I have absolutely nothing against that process. And it´s normal having the steps you mentioned - because I am already in contact with the company!

The annoying part is mostly the emails and phone calls from external recruiters, which bring absolutely nothing.

So to answer your questions:
1) For me internal recruiters are just fine. and i am not bothered or annoyed by them at all.
2) hard to say.

  • Go to Meetups and connect,
  • join these Recruiting Speed Dating events that are being organized anywhere nowadays,
  • search github, blogs and dev forums and network with people,
  • use referral systems among your employees so that they are prompted to share job opening on their social networks. etc..

And anyway, honestly. I am actively looking for a job, I google all the companies / startups that are in my area. and apply to those that I like. so just having a website and be on google maps it´s enought to be on my radar :-)

Collapse
ohryan profile image
Ryan

I've been having the exact same interactions with recruiters. It's gotten to the point where I just ask them for the employer and salary up front. If they can't give that, they're wasting my time.

Collapse
colinrhys profile image
Colin Rhys

I do the same of course with tact and class. I couldn't possibly do the "quick chat on the phone" with all of them every week. I have had a number of recruiters say they appreciate the upfront approach.

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

that´s been my approach too lately...

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

I was just contacted on Linkedin for a position as Frontend Dev with minimun 1 year of experience (and with very low salary). When I asked if they really checked my profile before sending this perfect match offer, they replied

I do not have actually time to check all the profiles I'm connecting.

when I replied that that is called SPAMMING PEOPLE, this is the reply:

We have filters for the search, so I would call it recruiter's work.

Clearly the filter don´t work properly and clearly this says it all about the Recruiter´s Work

Collapse
drbearhands profile image
DrBearhands

I'm not sure things used to be better 3~4 years ago. I remember a classmate getting called at work by a recruiter who called the company's receptionist, specifically asking to be forwarded to him. The recruiter had no info on him beyond knowing he was an employee for that company. Now that's gangsta.

Collapse
elitegroupasia profile image
Elite Group Asia

It sounds like you are being contacted by 'researchers' rather than the consultant themselves. Look to ask if the person you are speaking to is actually the person managing the search and dealing directly with the client.

Collapse
perigk profile image
Periklis Gkolias

For the past few years, I am getting an email every 2-3 weeks, calling me
"Dear Victor I know you are getting tons of offers", which ends with "only US citizens can apply" (I live in Greece) :D

Collapse
greenroommate profile image
Haris Secic

Drugs are bad mkay. - the only valid reply to some recruiters

Collapse
arctekdev profile image
Arctek 🧊

They keep offering me jobs in locations that I never even visited or considered visiting.

Hi there our client in Norway is looking for a developer and we think you might be good fit.

Collapse
dvddpl profile image
Davide de Paolis Author

that's not a problem per se - I actually moved to Hamburg from Italy even though I was quite happy there. I received an offer, discussed with my wife and made a life changing choice.

It's not good when you clearly state - as I often do know ( because I have kids in school already ) - that you are not considering any offer that requires relocation.

Collapse
arctekdev profile image
Arctek 🧊

It is a problem when I clearly communicate in my bio that I am not willing to relocate and only work remotely.

But I see your point.

Collapse
crimsonmed profile image
Médéric Burlet

I had a series of emails from a head huntress full of emojis and gifs... and their professional website had background pictures of the Raving Rabbids.