DEV Community 👩‍💻👨‍💻

Discussion on: Using Property Decorators in Typescript with a real example

Collapse
marcela profile image
Marcel A

This does not work. All instances of the User class do have the same value for Password! Here is an example: TypeScript Playground

Collapse
danywalls profile image
Dany Paredes Author

Thanks marcel for you feedback, the article was wrote one year and half, so I need take time for remmember, nowdays most of people use npmjs.com/package/reflect-metadata. If you found why is not working or someidea leave a message or link to share, When return from my holidays I promise update the article.

Collapse
josethz00 profile image
José Thomaz

any solution for this issue?

Thread Thread
jascmiller profile image
Jamie Miller • Edited on

Hi Jose,

I came up for a solution with this problem. One should set a value on the object themselves using a unique symbol rather than a value that is accessed on the prototype.

function Min(limit: number) {
return function(target: Object, propertyKey: string) {
const symbol = Symbol();
Object.defineProperty(target, propertyKey, {
get: function() {
return this[symbol];
},
set: function(newVal: string) {
if(newVal.length < limit) {
Object.defineProperty(target, 'errors', {
value: Your password should be bigger than ${limit}
});
}
else {
this[symbol] = newVal;
}

}
});
}
}

Collapse
jascmiller profile image
Jamie Miller

Hi Danny,

I came up for a solution with this problem. One should set a value on the object themselves using a unique symbol rather than a value that is accessed on the prototype.

function Min(limit: number) {
return function(target: Object, propertyKey: string) {
const symbol = Symbol();
Object.defineProperty(target, propertyKey, {
get: function() {
return this[symbol];
},
set: function(newVal: string) {
if(newVal.length < limit) {
Object.defineProperty(target, 'errors', {
value: Your password should be bigger than ${limit}
});
}
else {
this[symbol] = newVal;
}

}
});
}
}

Collapse
jascmiller profile image
Jamie Miller

Hi Marcel,

I came up for a solution with this problem. One should set a value on the object themselves using a unique symbol rather than a value that is accessed on the prototype.

function Min(limit: number) {
return function(target: Object, propertyKey: string) {
const symbol = Symbol();
Object.defineProperty(target, propertyKey, {
get: function() {
return this[symbol];
},
set: function(newVal: string) {
if(newVal.length < limit) {
Object.defineProperty(target, 'errors', {
value: Your password should be bigger than ${limit}
});
}
else {
this[symbol] = newVal;
}

}
});
}
}

Collapse
navjot50 profile image
Navjot • Edited on

There is a reason where every instance of User class is having the same value for the password. The article author is binding the properties to the target argument in the decorator function. According to the docs the target parameter in the decorator function is the prototype of the class (in this case User.prototype). So when the author did Object.defineProperty(target, propertyKey, { get: getter, set: setter }), then the property is being bound to the User.prototype object and not the current object. Since, the property is defined on the prototype it is available to all the instances of that class.