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Geometry analysis features in Aspose.GIS

nnevod profile image Dmitry Matuzko ・9 min read

Aspose.GIS doesn't only convert geospatial data between file formats and allows to create and read the data, it also allows some analysis of the data. Here I'll describe gow Aspose.GIS can be used for geospatial data analysis in more detail.

Geospatial features are represented as subclasses of Geometry class - Point, Surface, LineString (polyline), LinearRing, Polygon, MultiPoint, MultiLineString, MultiPolygon, and GeometryCollection. The methods used for analysis are provided by Geometry class and thus are availible for any geospatial feature. In this article I'll describe what methods are provided by Geometry class for analysis.

Properties

For the beginning, let'w review what properties the Geometry class provides:

CoordinateDimension

Gets number of coordinate dimensions of this geometry. I.e. 2 if there are only X and Y coordinates, 3 if there are X, Y and Z or M coordinate, etc.

Dimension

Gets topological dimension of the geometry - i.e. if it is a point, line or surface.

GeometryType

Gets type of geometry - essentially name of the class of the instance - if it is a Polygon, GeometryType will return GeometryType.Polygon.

HasM

Gets wether this geometry has M coordinate.
An M coordinate (measure) is a value that conveys information about a geographic feature and that is stored together with the coordinates that define the feature's location.
For example, suppose that you are representing highways in your application. If you want your application to process values that denote linear distances or mileposts, you can store these values along with the coordinates that define locations along the highway.

HasZ

Gets wether this geometry has Z coordinate (elevation).

IsEmpty

Gets wether this geometry is empty (i.e. contains no geospatial data).

IsSimple

Gets wether this geometry is simple in SFA terms.
Here is an example:

LineString lineString = new LineString();
bool simple = lineString.IsSimple; // simple == true
lineString.AddPoint(0, 0);
lineString.AddPoint(1, 0);
simple = lineString.IsSimple; // simple == true
lineString.AddPoint(0.5, 0);
simple = lineString.IsSimple; // simple == false (line string crosses itself)

IsValid

Gets wether this geometry is valid.
Here is an example:

LinearRing linearRing = new LinearRing();
linearRing.AddPoint(0, 0);
linearRing.AddPoint(0, 1);
linearRing.AddPoint(1, 0);
bool valid = linearRing.IsValid; // valid == false
linearRing.AddPoint(0, 0);
valid = linearRing.IsValid; // valid == true

Null

Static method that returns null geometry.

SpatialReferenceSystem

Gets SpatialReferenceSystem of this Geometry. It can be null, if SRS is not known. Assigning new SRS won't perform any transformation, only reference will be changed.

Methods for basic property analysis

GetArea

Gets area of the geometry, if it is a collection, then sum of all areas.

GetDistanceTo

Gets closest distance from this geometry to specified other geometry. If at least one of geometries is empty, returns -1.

GetLength

Gets length of the geometry. If it is a Polygon, then returns perimeter. If it is a collection, then returns sum of all lengths.

Methods for boolean relationships

CoveredBy

Returns true if this geometry is spatially covered by another geometry, otherwise false.

Covers

Returns true is this geometry spatially covers the other geometry. Essentially same as CoveredBy with this and other geometries swapped.

Crosses

Tests wether two geometries cross, i.e. they have some but not all interior points in common, and dimension of the intersection is smaller than dimension of at least one of geometries, i.e. for example intersection is a line while one of geometries is a surface.
Here is an example:

var geometry1 = new LineString();
geometry1.AddPoint(0, 0);
geometry1.AddPoint(2, 2);

var geometry2 = new LineString();
geometry2.AddPoint(1, 1);
geometry2.AddPoint(3, 3);

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Crosses(geometry2)); // False

var geometry3 = new LineString();
geometry3.AddPoint(0, 2);
geometry3.AddPoint(2, 0);

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Crosses(geometry3)); // True

Disjoint

Returns true if two geometries have no common points.

Intersects

The reverse of Disjoint.
Here is an example:

var geometry1 = new Polygon(new LinearRing(new[]
{
    new Point(0, 0),
    new Point(0, 3),
    new Point(3, 3),
    new Point(3, 0),
    new Point(0, 0),
}));

var geometry2 = new Polygon(new LinearRing(new[]
{
    new Point(1, 1),
    new Point(1, 4),
    new Point(4, 4),
    new Point(4, 1),
    new Point(1, 1),
}));

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Intersects(geometry2)); // True
Console.WriteLine(geometry2.Intersects(geometry1)); // True

// 'Disjoint' is opposite to 'Intersects'
Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Disjoint(geometry2)); // False

Overlaps

Tests wether geometries overlap, as in they have some interior points in common and intersection has same dimension as geometries, i.e. for example geometries are surfaces and intersection is a surface too. Always false if geometries are of different dimensions.
Here is an example:

var geometry1 = new LineString();
geometry1.AddPoint(0, 0);
geometry1.AddPoint(0, 2);

var geometry2 = new LineString();
geometry2.AddPoint(0, 2);
geometry2.AddPoint(0, 3);

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Overlaps(geometry2)); // False

var geometry3 = new LineString();
geometry3.AddPoint(0, 1);
geometry3.AddPoint(0, 3);

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Overlaps(geometry3)); // True

SpatiallyContains

Tests if this geometry spatially contains another.
Here is an example:

var geometry1 = new Polygon();
geometry1.ExteriorRing = new LinearRing(new[]
{
    new Point(0, 0),
    new Point(0, 4),
    new Point(4, 4),
    new Point(4, 0),
    new Point(0, 0),
});
geometry1.AddInteriorRing(new LinearRing(new[]
{
    new Point(1, 1),
    new Point(1, 3),
    new Point(3, 3),
    new Point(3, 1),
    new Point(1, 1),
}));

var geometry2 = new Point(2, 2);

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.SpatiallyContains(geometry2)); // False

var geometry3 = new Point(0.5, 0.5);
Console.WriteLine(geometry1.SpatiallyContains(geometry3)); // True

// 'a.SpatiallyContains(b)' equals to 'b.Within(a)'
Console.WriteLine(geometry3.Within(geometry1)); // True

SpatiallyEquals

Tests if two geometries are spatially equal. Essentially, tests if two geometries occupy same space when projected onto two-dimensional space. Here is an example:

var geometry1 = new MultiLineString
{
    new LineString(new [] { new Point(0, 0), new Point(1, 1) }),
    new LineString(new [] { new Point(1, 1), new Point(2, 2) }),
};

var geometry2 = new LineString(new[]
{
    new Point(0, 0), new Point(2, 2),
});

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.SpatiallyEquals(geometry2)); // True

geometry2.AddPoint(3, 3);
Console.WriteLine(geometry1.SpatiallyEquals(geometry2)); // False

Touches

Returns true if two geometries have at lease one common boundary points, but no interior points.
Here is an example:

var geometry1 = new LineString();
geometry1.AddPoint(0, 0);
geometry1.AddPoint(2, 2);

var geometry2 = new LineString();
geometry2.AddPoint(2, 2);
geometry2.AddPoint(3, 3);

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Touches(geometry2)); // True
Console.WriteLine(geometry2.Touches(geometry1)); // True

var geometry3 = new Point(2, 2);
Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Touches(geometry3)); // True

var geometry4 = new LineString();
geometry4.AddPoint(1, 1);
geometry4.AddPoint(4, 4);

Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Touches(geometry4)); // False

Within

Tests if geometry is contained by another. Equal to SpatiallyContains with this and other geometries swapped.

Methods for generation of derivative geometry

Difference

Returns geometry that is a difference of this geometry and the argument geometry, containing points from this geometry, that are not contained in argument geometry.

GetBuffer

Returns geometry that contains all points within specified distance from this geometry. Useful when you need a 'border area' around geometry.

GetCentroid

Returns geometric center of geometry, in layman terms - point at which cutout of the shape can be perfectly balanced on a pin.

GetConvexHull

Returns convex hull of the geometry. Null if geometry is empty, point if geometry is a point, is it's two points, then line between points, otherwise ILinearRing that is a convex hull around all points.

Intersection

Returns geometry that contains points that are contained in both this geometry and argument geometry.

SymDifference

Returns geometry that contains points that are contained in either this or argument geometry, but not both.

Union

Returns geometry that is a sum of this and argument geometries, containing points from both geometries.

General case relation, DE-9IM model.

The Relate method allows one to specify any desired pattern for DE-9IM intersection matrix. In fact, most of the above relation-deriving methods are wrappers for this method. Method builds DE-9IM matrix for the two geometries and tests if it fits the provided pattern.
Pattern is a string of 9 characters.
Each position represents specific spatial relation:

  • 0 - between interiors of geometries.
  • 1 - between interior of this geometry and boundary of the other.
  • 2 - between interior of this geometry and exterior of the other.
  • 3 - between boundary of this geometry and interor of the other.
  • 4 - between boundaries of the geometries.
  • 5 - between boundary of this geometry and exterior of the other.
  • 6 - between exterior of this geometry and interior of another geometry.
  • 7 - between exterior of this geometry and boundary of another geometry.
  • 8 - between exteriors of the geometries.

Each character can have the following values:

  • * - any value
  • F - no intersection
  • T - any intersection
  • 0 - point intersection (shared point)
  • 1 - line intersection (shared line segment)
  • 2 - surface intersection (shared part of polygon)

For example, an intersection pattern "F0*******" means, that there should not be intersection between geometries interiors and intersection between geometries boundaries must be a point.
Also you can see OpenGIS Simple Features Specification for more details.
Here is an example on how to use it:

var geometry1 = new LineString();
geometry1.AddPoint(0, 0);
geometry1.AddPoint(0, 2);

var geometry2 = new LineString();
geometry2.AddPoint(0, 1);
geometry2.AddPoint(0, 3);

// Relate method takes a string representation of DE-9IM matrix
// (Dimensionally Extended Nine-Intersection Model matrix).
// see Simple Feature Access specification for more details on DE-9IM.

// this is the equivalent of 'geometry1.SpatiallyEquals(geometry2)'
Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Relate(geometry2, "T*F**FFF*")); // False

// this is the equivalent of 'geometry1.Disjoint(geometry2)'
Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Relate(geometry2, "FF*FF****")); // False

// this is the equivalent of 'geometry1.Overlaps(geometry2)'
Console.WriteLine(geometry1.Relate(geometry2, "1*T***T**")); // True

Miscellaneous methods

RoundM

Rounds M coordinate to a specified number of fractional digits.

RoundXY

Rounds X and Y coordinates to a specified number of fractional digits.

RoundZ

Rounds Z coordinate to a specified number of fractional digits.

SetEmpty

Empties the geometry.

Together, these methods allow you to analyse topological relation of geometries, do 'cookie-cutting', compare their areas and a lot more.

That's all for now, stay tuned!

For more examples please visit the Aspose.GIS GitHub page. There's also Twitter and Facebook pages for news on Aspose.GIS.

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