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re: Javascript VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

I understand how you feel. I'm kind of going through the same thing.
Way back in 2012 or so, I was really starting to learn programming and I fell in love with JS. The only real frameworks or libraries I knew about were JQuery and... that's it.
After finishing a few projects and having felt like I really understood Javascript, I started learning Ruby on Rails, and Javascript fell out of my view. I woke up four years later, in 2016, bored with Rails and realizing that my love, Javascript, was too good for me now. I didn't understand any of the frameworks or what was so special about them. There were so many different things to learn about: the tooling, the linting, the webpack-ing, the components, the arrow functions!
I've started to reconcile with Javascript a little bit. I've made my way through an Angular 2 tutorial (which is in TypeScript rather than Javascript, incidentally), but we aren't best friends anymore, and I don't use Javascript often, if at all anymore. I write lots of Java for my Computer Science classes and lots of Python for my job.

Anyways, I would say it's not a waste to learn vanilla/native/pure Javascript (Javascript without any frameworks or other tools). Javascript is, above all, a fun language. It's dynamic and flexible and helped me understand basic programming paradigms. But if you already have a strong background in programming (you've said you know lots of different languages), Javascript isn't a necessity. You can do great things all the while completely ignoring it. Don't feel like you have to get a Javascript job or know even a smidgen of it.

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