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RajeshKumarYadav.com
RajeshKumarYadav.com

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Node.js : Hello World basic routing

Once you understand how to create an HTTP Server with node, it's important to understand how to make it "do"
things based on the path that a user has navigated to. This phenomenon is called, "routing".

The most basic example of this would be to check if (request.url === 'some/path/here'), and then call a function that responds with a new file.

An example of this can be seen here:

const http = require('http');
function index (request, response) {
 response.writeHead(200);
 response.end('Hello, World!');
}
http.createServer(function (request, response) {

 if (request.url === '/') {
 return index(request, response);
 }
 response.writeHead(404);
 response.end(http.STATUS_CODES[404]);
}).listen(1337);
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If you continue to define your "routes" like this, though, you'll end up with one massive callback function, and we don't want a giant mess like that, so let's see if we can clean this up.

First, let's store all of our routes in an object:

var routes = {
 '/': function index (request, response) {
 response.writeHead(200);
 response.end('Hello, World!');
 },
 '/foo': function foo (request, response) {
 response.writeHead(200);
 response.end('You are now viewing "foo"');
 }
}
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Now that we've stored 2 routes in an object, we can now check for them in our main callback:

http.createServer(function (request, response) {

 if (request.url in routes) {
 return routes[request.url](request, response);
 }
 response.writeHead(404);
 response.end(http.STATUS_CODES[404]);
}).listen(1337);
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Now every time you try to navigate your website, it will check for the existence of that path in your routes, and it will
call the respective function. If no route is found, the server will respond with a 404 (Not Found). And there you have it--routing with the HTTP Server API is very simple.

With all that being said, I highly recommend you keep learning!

Thank you for reading this article. Please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn and Twitter.

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Timeless DEV post...

How to write a kickass README

Arguably the single most important piece of documentation for any open source project is the README. A good README not only informs people what the project does and who it is for but also how they use and contribute to it.

If you write a README without sufficient explanation of what your project does or how people can use it then it pretty much defeats the purpose of being open source as other developers are less likely to engage with or contribute towards it.