re: Are You a Mediocre Developer? ME TOO VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

I do not mean to be confrontational in this comment, but as an independent person looking at this, I would like to offer some feedback.

  • If I am leading and defining what a team should do, what would make me the most happy is if they do exactly what was asked for and it is done well. I do not feel that you did that. There was no mention of Vue, Heroku, or going above and beyond in the assignment. From my point of view, if I were to ask someone to create a "web-based front-end", I'm thinking of an HTML page with some forms and minimal styling. If that candidate invented the next great front-end framework as a part of the assignment, I would turn them down. Why? Because I did not ask for it and I do not have the knowledge or time to understand it and review it. Focus on understanding the interest of what they are trying to assess. It was very clearly focused on Python/Django. By doing more, you give them more to critique. By doing more, there is more that can go wrong. By doing more, it is more for them to review. By doing more, it is more for them to maintain. They are reviewing you as a potential team member, you have to remember that.
  • The language used in the emails is not something I would ever use on the job or while applying for a job. Words like "gotta", "gonna", "cuz", ":D", "!?", "lemme", and emojis. I'd let one or two of them slide but you should ensure you are presenting yourself in the best way possible when communicating with your potential boss.
  • The assignment specifically mentions building the application in small logical steps so they can see how you can visualize the problem, break it down into manageable steps, and then solve it incrementally. You may have made small commits, but if it didn't clearly show your progression then you did not meet this challenge. The email the next day saying "I'm almost done" and "Gonna review the requirements to see if I missed something" raises concern for me that you did not do that. The requirements should have been understood and a plan to meet them should have been established before writing any code.
  • In reading their initial response, they gave you more feedback than any job I have seen. They also gave you a second chance to make updates and redeem yourself and I believe they were sincere in that. Your response to their feedback seemed a bit confrontational, even if it was not intended that way. Their final rejection was very explicit and offered great feedback for next time. They even gave an example of someone else's assignment. It seems to me that you are disregarding their feedback and making it seem like they are ghosting you when I think they went above and beyond.

I hope you can reflect on this and take their feedback and mine to heart. I don't believe that you are a mediocre developer, you have the coding skills. There is more to being a developer than cranking out code, so work on those aspects and you will be fine.

 

As someone who has done a lot of interviewing over the past few years, I concur with some points. We give candidates very strict guidelines on what we expect from the submission, both in terms of scope and style, so ignoring that is definitely a red flag.

That said our exercise is a lot more manageable since it's a task that can be done without any external libraries (this is in fact a requirement) in anywhere between 2-6h depending on skill level and attention to detail.

 

Hey Michael, would you like to share more details about your test case?

The external library is intentionally part of our requirement. There are a ton of libraries to validate IBANs. How will the candidate chose between them? Will they use one at all or implement an already solved problem again reinventing the wheel, etc.

 

I would like to clarify few things:

Since when doing well in a task and going beyond sounds bad?

Words like "gotta", "gonna", "cuz", ":D", "!?", "lemme", and emojis.

I was explicitly asked to avoid formalities (with a smile emoji):

formal

but if it didn't clearly show your progression then you did not meet this challenge. The email the next day saying "I'm almost done" and "Gonna review the requirements to see if I missed something" raises concern for me that you did not do that

For the sake of conciseness, I didn't share how I approached the task:

done

There is more to being a developer than cranking out code

Yeah, there is the "dealing with humans" aspect, which they might be super bad at.

 

This is one lesson I learnt over time because of a great feedback from a company in Germany. Even when they made it clear upfront I didn't manke the cut. They spent time on both written and video interview-styled feedback. That was very valuale time. I realised all of the negative feedbacks came from the extra stuffs I was trying to do.At least 90%. Like I tried to deploy to Heroku but couldn't, then just used firebase instead. I left some heroku related files.I implemented a complex modal I wasn't asked.It turned out to have the most criticsm.

At that point, I had very little experience and was always trying to impress. It backfired every single time.

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