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re: Do whiteboard interviews still exist? 🤔 VIEW POST

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re: One thing that often gets lost in the whiteboard communications process is that a lot of programmers are introverts and are less than comfortable w...
 

As an introvert I think that I might have an issue with freezing up if asked to whiteboard in front of someone, especially if I don't know them. I just would feel really uncomfortable.

Part of it is just my personality, the other part is that I tend to code in bursts.

I'm not sure of how others do their thing but when I am working on something I sit back and think for quite a bit of time before implementing a solution to build a mental framework for the task at hand. Sometimes this process can take a long time.

For example, at my last job I was asked to refactor a Salesforce trigger that had a DML limit issue. Being both new to Salesforce dev and the company I had to really go through the code to understand the objects, business rules and relationships involved. I'm not sure how many times I read and reread the code before jumping off, probably 2 or 3 hours of trying to understand what was going on. I took notes and first built up the solution on paper via a mix of psuedo and real code to break the monolithic method (something along the lines of 500 lines of code) into smaller, more atomic chunks to resolve the issue.

I know that doesn't directly apply to white boarding a solution, which is likely to be be a much smaller problem set but it does show how I think. I've always been someone that likes to build up a strategy/plan for what I need to accomplish before acting. I could appear to be stuck or not understand to a casual observer while I am going through my problem solving process. Once you add the pressure of observation to the equation I am more likely to act before I get a chance to think things through fully or not be able to perform entirely. The same sort of issues occur when I am writing code and suddenly notice a boss or lead type of person silently looking over my shoulder silently observing me working.

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