re: The new MacBook Pros are overpriced VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

I have a very similar situation to deal with. My 2012 MBP-Retina is not enough for my needs, and I was looking into upgrading.
You've raised good points, my biggest concern is how well will I work on a Linux or Windows machine?

What is the actual cost of the learning curve to switch to Linux or Windows machines, set it up for your needs, get it to the level that these machines work for you and help you do better, and not you working around their limitations?

 

What is the actual cost of the learning curve to switch to Linux or Windows machines, set it up for your needs, get it to the level that these machines work for you and help you do better, and not you working around their limitations?

Probably the only way to answer that question is with research. You're the only one that knows which software and tools you need inside and outside development. Make a list of the major things you need and see how well they work on Linux and Windows.

These might help:

 

If you use the terminal at all, a lot of the concepts will transfer more or less directly (OSX is based on BSD Unix, which is a near relative of Linux). Instead of /Users/you you'll have /home/you, instead of launchd you have the much nicer systemd, and most distros have a proper package manager built in. The graphical interface is effectively a matter of taste with Linux; you can install and run any of dozens of different window managers, and most are very customizable.

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