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Discussion on: Dealing with developer burnout as a codenewbie

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voboda profile image
voboda

Some good advice in all the comments -

A few things that helped me with burn out:

  1. Meditation, especially as a practice to become aware of your state of mind.
  2. Tuning into your motivation. I let myself work on whatever my mind is already thinking about, rather than forcing myself. The "chores" have a way of becoming interesting later as long as you can keep the "motivation momentum" going.
  3. Build off "anchor habits." For me, my morning coffee was a pretty regular routine, so I started adding meditation (5 minutes) after coffee. Then yoga (5 minutes) after mediation. That makes a bad habit useful to build good habits, rather than trying to "break" habits which is way harder. I also don't worry about "streaks" I just try to pick something easy enough that I do it daily and if I miss a day, who cares. After a year, I meditate for 20 minutes, and do you yoga for 20-30 minutes each day, though I started with 5.

By the way, meditation can take many forms, it can be done to give yourself a break from thought loops, to become aware of how your mind works. If it's interesting, I made a little meditation app/journal inspired by a less common style of meditation called koans.

To deal with learning overload, here are a few other heuristics that might be useful:

  1. Easy means easy to debug. So I try to avoid introducing complexity.
  2. I don't waste time on automation or abstractions if I can just ship it a simple way first. (I say this to myself, but if I'm honest, I get pretty caught up in rabbit holes a lot.)
  3. I give myself time to learn fundamental APIs, but not convenience APIs. (Convenience libraries are the ones that sell themselves as time savers up-front, but are abstractions of something with the same function. If a convenience library shows any early signs of being tricky, or I need to look at its code to figure something out, I throw it out and let myself spend the time to learn the underlying API instead. Eg. IntersectionObserver, Web Push, Web Workers. These are easier than you think, and in the end, easier to work with them directly than finding some module on npm.)