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re: You are mocking it wrong. VIEW POST

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re: In my view overly complicated test code (with or without mocks) is a design smell of the underlying system not being very testable. There are a few...
 

Thanks for the comment.

Mocks and SOLID are not synonyms. Not using mocks in tests does not mean the system is badly designed. Lots of mocks is not a symptom of a good design either.

If you were able to replace the dependency with the mock it does not mean that the test became a good one. It just became a test which verifies the interaction with the mock. If your mock behavior does not affect the class logic/results why do you even need this dependency?

Imagine that you have a class with no dependencies. It does some calculations. You have a test which verifies that. I believe that's called a unit test.

Next day you decided to extract the actual calculation into a separate class. You know, like a one-shortcut action in your IDE. And boom, your test is now a bad and slow integration test. Now you have to mock that dependency. It's ok, you will write a new unit test for the new class, rewrite all the existing tests for the old one.

The day after you realized that that wasn't a right decision. Will that be a simple task to bring everything back? (yes, you can revert the commit, but that's not always a good option).

My point is that the excessive use of mocks made your system very resistant to refactoring. It's just way to expensive to constantly improve and modify your code. And that leads to a bad design. And that makes unit tests with mocks very expensive.

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