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Discussion on: How to Check the Compatibility of PC Parts?

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athomsfere profile image
Austin French

I see a few points I think are critically lacking. Great start, but maybe think about expanding:

CPU compatibility, Regardless of truth with it right now. Check 2 things with your CPU. The socket and the chipset. Sometimes even a socket compatible processor won't work with a board if the chipsets are too far out of date. Sometimes you might lose features. Good luck for example with a Ryzen 5900x on a b350 board!

GPU: Doesn't matter for all workloads. Feel free to get an APU or cheap GPU for most office related work. Rendering, gaming and video editing tend to require a decent GPU, but it depends on the software.

RAM: The speed is what it should run at, with XMP, stably. You can overclock any RAM. Get faster RAM if performance is critical. In gaming for example DDR4 3600 CL16 can gain you several "free" FPS over DDR4 3200 CL16. You need to balance frequency of the chips, latency and price, but every CPU has a cost/performance "sweet spot".
Finally, check the RAM and Motherboard QVL. If you want the best odds of a stable system.

Drives: SSD/ NVMe are much faster and more expensive. Buy a decent sized NAND drive for the OS and important apps (I have a 1TB SSD, and a 256GB SSD for OS and a dedicated swap drive) and then a big HDD for storage. (I have a couple 3TB drives for games, pictures, and videos).

Fans: They keep everything cool. The CPU might get a lot of attention, but if the case ambient temps are high, nothing works as well. The CPU and GPU will throttle more (decreasing performance) and the even the SSD, HDD, and PSU become less efficient. In general, buy a bigger high quality fan over a couple small fans. They will move more air, and more quietly.

And paste: IF you are going to spend $1000+ on a build, use a decent paste. And while some CPU stock coolers are fine, if you really plan to push the limits of the CPU get a good after market cooler, and use that better paste to really see the best temps you can.

And there are kind of 3 types of coolers: Air, Liquid and AIO (All in One). An AIO makes liquid cooling cheaper and safer. But, a good air cooler can do just as well as at cooling as a not good AIO / water cooling setup.

Power Supply:
Don't cheap out here. Use a power supply calculator (from a reputable PSU brand) to see what your minimum requirements are. Add around 20% and then buy that or close to that. And buy a good brand, and check reviews. NZXT appears to rebrand Seasonic which are great. Corsair are usually great, as well as Superflower, EVGA and Antec. A cheap PSU going out can kill your entire PC by overloading the components. Also, look at the EPA certified rating. The higher the rating the better.

Cases: The form factor should have been mentioned for motherboards too. A case can easily support all of these, one of these or a few of these. Some even support a dual system (ITX and a ATX). But check here for features you care about. AIO won't fit in all cases. USB 3 front panels? Check that the case supports it.

Build Quality of the case: How well do the panels align, is there decent cable routing? If the fans are included, are they decent? What fans does it support, and how many? How many 2.5 and 3.5 inch internal bays are there for drives? Do you need an external 5.25?

Cases have come a long way though. Even a $40 case is 1000 times better than a case 15 years would have been for $300.

I've been doing this far too long, but a couple recent builds: Well, one was a budget rebuild.

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5unnykum4r profile image
Sunny Kumar Author

Thanks for mentioning all these... I was bit confused while sharing this post on this platform as my first post.

As the name, people mostly share related to development and languages... but I’ve knowledge about PC builds so at first I thought it would be awkward to share all these information here.

I never thought people like you also read posts on Dev.to (compliment)

I’ll surely keep all these things in my mind... and surely I’ll update the post as soon as I get the time.

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athomsfere profile image
Austin French

LOL, I am here for the Dev stuff (full stack developer) but I've also put a ton of time in with hardware both professionally and for fun.

And sadly, my home machine runs circles around my work machine for development!