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Discussion on: My tech stack if I had to build an app today

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Ben Halpern

Thanks for a lot of good info, Fredinand. I still default to Rails for brand new projects that need early momentum, with the intention of breaking out into polyglot services as the need arises. The rational being the maturity of the Rails stack and community, combined with the ease of rapidly building out features. Rails doesn't exactly make for great software and it's easy to stub your toe and create technical debt, but in practical terms it is very easy to be productive.

Otherwise, I'd have a look at going all in on functional programming with an Elixir/Phoenix app with Elm on the front end. It makes for a logically and technically scaleable application by default.

The Changelog recently wrote about their process building a Phoenix app and open-sourced it. I think it made for a really helpful look because their app needs were pretty typical CRUD behavior and it's easy to know where to look in the code even if you are completely unfamiliar with the stack.

Another open-source Elixir/Phoenix app I've come across is the very well-documented Code Corps app. That uses Ember on the front end.

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Ferdinand Mütsch Author

Thanks for that comment! To be honest, I haven't even written a single line of Ruby code, but I know that Rails is pretty popular for web backends, especially because of its ease of use. However, I've recently read several times that Ruby + Rails is on a downside trend and losing popularity.

Elixir and Elm definitely fit into my topic of a cutting-edge, "fancy" stack and are certainly worth getting at least a little more familiar with their concepts, if you're a web developer. But I don't know if they're production ready, yet...

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Ben Halpern

I've come to see the "losing popularity" thing as a feature and not a bug. Rails really blew up and was the new hotness for a long time. I think being old guard technology with a stable community that takes its time to make important choices and a BDFL who still really cares about developer UX. I'm glad that a lot of bootcamps are moving away from the stack because it was probably getting saturated, and teaching Rails is probably not the best way to teach good software practices.

Rails remains a great stack for being super productive on new projects.