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Discussion on: Decentralizing Video Games - An Introduction

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polats profile image
Paul Gadi Author

Hey Ben, thanks for the questions!

An SNS Login is a social network login, one of the most common examples is when you use Facebook to login to a game you're playing.

When you play a game (this is more obvious in mobile free-to-play ones), you're usually asked to confirm that your data will be tracked. Most popular free-to-play games use ad networks to serve you the ads you see when playing them.

The graphs will make more sense if you read the link on Quadratic Voting (vitalik.ca/general/2019/12/07/quad...), a short answer is that the graphs show there are better ways of making the community's votes matter in an economic system.

My belief is that games are instead centralized by default, since game developers are locked-in to certain platforms due to economic considerations. And yes, there are some pretty good alternative game engines. Web-based ones are particularly more open, such as A-Frame, Phaser, and Babylon.js.

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moopet profile image
Ben Sinclair

In my mind, games are games are games. Sometimes you get a game like an MMO where you need to be connected to other people, but it's the exception. Nothing about games inherently makes them need to phone home even, let alone have some kind of central authority.

I guess I don't play games on my phone so I don't come across this. Is that what you're getting at? Is this mostly about mobile games?

Full disclosure I have only installed three games on my phone in the past: one is entirely self-contained, one theoretically connects via some kind of SNS to share global high scores, but the feature never worked, and the last never got past the installer so it was money down the drain.

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polats profile image
Paul Gadi Author

Yeah It's definitely more pronounced on mobile games and free-to-play games, but we're starting to see this also move unto other platforms. For example Street Fighter 5, which used to be a pay-once and play offline game, is now mostly monetized via in-app transactions and ads (though the ad model seems to have failed after some player outcry).

All video games will have some form of dependency on platforms, like from what store you downloaded them from. Even more open stores like Steam have an effect on how the games are made.