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Discussion on: Why Tailwind? A long term user perspective

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bcowley1220 profile image
Brendan Cowley

I'll reiterate a general theme from some of the other commenters. The issue is not the tailwinds, the issue is people are not learning how to write CSS by hand. All of these frameworks are great, until you have to do something custom or you have to work out UI bugs that are caused by said frameworks.

At the end of the day this really just comes down to preference. I write CSS by hand and enjoy doing it. I also pull from my own component cache because I have full confidence in that code. I know others that will not deviate from some of these frameworks because they hate writing CSS and don't have the aptitude for it. The important thing, especially when you're working with the team or knowing you're going to hand this project off to somebody else, is to make it digestible by another developer who has no clue about the tools that you're using.

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ecklf profile image
Florentin / 珞辰 Author

Thanks for sharing your thoughts Brendan. I'd like to comment on some things.

the issue is people are not learning how to write CSS

I don't think this is the case. Since Tailwind is just an abstraction over CSS, you still need to understand the fundamentals at some point. Need to apply global styles? You learn about selectors. Need to support more than light / dark mode? You learn custom properties. The path of learning may look different but at the end of the day, it matters that you start learning in the first place.

Besides that, Tailwind also teaches you properties that most other developers don't even know. Examples for that would be blend_mode and font_variant_numeric.

All of these frameworks are great, until you have to do something custom or you have to work out UI bugs that are caused by said frameworks.

Tailwind is laid out entirely for customization, so I don't know which part you cannot customize with it. Regarding UI bugs, I think it reduces them because you can directly read the styling from the HTML in PRs. If you set up PostCSS you get tools for prefixing which help you avoid browser-specific bugs. Framework specific bugs? I yet have to encounter them. Remember it's just an abstraction of CSS, so chances are you found a new IE Safari bug.

The important thing, especially when you're working with the team or knowing you're going to hand this project off to somebody else, is to make it digestible by another developer who has no clue about the tools that you're using.

When it comes to styling there are always different tools that come with a certain learning curve. All that matters in my opinion is that it is done consistently. I'm glad you have found a solution that you feel comfortable with.