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Discussion on: Are you an awesome developer???

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darkwiiplayer profile image
DarkWiiPlayer

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Can't fully agree with 7; saving a single iteration at the cost of an added if statement might not be worth it, depending on your problem domain and whether the language is smart enough to optimise this.

As for question 6, this happens to me a lot: I can't watch someone program something without a voice in the back of my head nagging me that "I would do this differently" (and of course, ones own way of doing it is always "better" :D)

A bit of criticism towards the first question: Those are very typical interview questions, and I don't think knowing the solutions from interview preparations is really worth anything. Some of those problems we've simply memorised the solutions to, and that won't help us in real-life programming. Those examples that we don't have memorised and would have to come up with a solution for say the most: any good programmer should be able to quickly figure out these problems even if they had never heard them before.

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rubalk profile image
rubalk Author

Hey thanks for your input, really appreciate it!!!
However, I personally code it differently every time I am made to solve it, doesn't probably take away the thrill for me. Also, for us guys who have been taught a lot given our educational background it might seem to be repetitive, but for self taught developer developers it's not the case I believe. And yeah they sure seem to be cliched interview questions but cliche exists for a reason.

Thanks again.

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DarkWiiPlayer

Also, for us guys who have been taught a lot given our educational background

I don't remember ever learning any of those algorithms in formal education, but most of them I've seen on lists of "top X interview questions" and such.

But regardless of education level, finding any of these problems and being able to solve them because you know how they work doesn't say much.

But they're still excellent interview questions, because you can use these relatively simple snippets of code to start a conversation and figure out how well someone understands the code and how it works. Starting with Fibonacci, for example, there's a lot to be said about recursion.

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rubalk profile image
rubalk Author

I guess, there is a difference in our educational background. But anyways, when beginning the journey as a programmer we tend to solve small and easy questions and the problem statements that I mentioned are some of them. We do so because it helps to build our logic and get the essence of how programming languages work. Of course, these questions are asked during interviews, but again the purpose is same - to check the logical ability of the candidate.
I am just talking about my observations that I noticed on different types of people working in the same background. My purpose of writing that point was just to highlight the logical and reasoning ability of a developer. And we never know there might me some around us who never tried these questions or some who are very quick to solve them.
I believe, there is no obvious question in the programming world.

Thank You for sharing. It was nice to know your views.