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DevCronin
DevCronin

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LEVEL UP with JavaScript! LVL 5

In this blog series tutorial, I will be covering some of the basic JavaScript programming concepts.

This is geared toward beginners and anyone looking to refresh their knowledge.

See the Previous Level Here

Level 5 will cover:

  • Concatenating Strings with Plus Equals Operator
  • Constructing Strings with Variables
  • Appending Variables to Strings
  • Find the Length of a String
  • Use Bracket Notation to Find the First Character in a String

Concatenating Strings with Plus Equals Operator

As we did with the compounded assignment (+=) operator before, now we will use it to concatenate a string on an existing variable.

Remember, spaces only exist if we add them.

let iroh = "dragon, "; 

iroh += "of the west."; 

console.log(iroh);

"dragon, of the west"

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Constructing Strings with Variables

In JavaScript, it is common to build longer, more complex strings.

To do this we will be using the concatenation operator (+) to insert one or more variables to construct the string.

let mySpell = "magic missile"; 

let spellDescription = "I cast " + mySpell + ", and three glowing darts home in on my target."; 

console.log(spellDescription)

"I cast magic missile, and three glowing darts home in on my target."

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Appending Variables to Strings

Variables can also be appended to strings using the (+=) operator.


let alignment = "Chaotic "; 

let alignmentTwo = "Good";

alignment += alignmentTwo; 

console.log(alignment);

Chaotic Good

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Find the Length of a String

To find the length of a string we use ".length" after the string but before the end (;).

Length is given in the number of characters start with the index of zero.

It can also be used on string variables or string literals.


let game = "Dungeons and Dragons";

let gameLength = game.length; 

console.log(gameLength);

20

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Use Bracket Notation to Find the First Character in a String

In JavaScript counting starts at 0, and is referred to as Zero-based indexing.

By using bracket notation ([]) we can get any character at a specific index in a string.

let character = "Wizard"; 

let firstLetter = character[0];

console.log(firstLetter);

"W"

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Thank you for reading my blog! This is the Fifth of my series on JavaScript so if you would like to read more, please follow!

See the Next Level Here

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Discussion (9)

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wagyourtail profile image
wagyourtail

Template strings ...

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devcronin profile image
DevCronin Author

Can you eleborate?

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wagyourtail profile image
wagyourtail • Edited on

at least, for constructing strings with variables section it is much cleaner to do

let spellDescription = `I cast ${mySpell}, and three glowing darts home in on my target.`; 
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devcronin profile image
DevCronin Author

I see, Thank you!

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nosthrillz profile image
Ilie Bogdan

For the love of readers, pls link to the other articles in the series...

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devcronin profile image
DevCronin Author

Yeah i'm new to blogging 😅. Thank you!

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nosthrillz profile image
Ilie Bogdan

I just realized my comment seemed negative in tone, I didn't mean that. Great article, but keep your focus on the user first :D

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devcronin profile image
DevCronin Author

That's okay and I will do that!

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nader001cv profile image
NADER-001cv

GOOD